Malaysia puts nuclear power plans on hold

Reading Time: 1 minute

malaysia-nuclear-powerThe Malaysian government will shelve plans to build nuclear power plants despite rising energy needs driven by economic and population growth, the Wall Street Journal reported on October 17.

According to the Minister of Energy, Green Technology and Water, Maximus Johnity Ongkili, “the sentiment at the moment is not quite in favor [of nuclear power], and we need to get a lot more buy-in.”

Malaysia has long been considering plans to build two nuclear plants, in part because of growing shortages of domestic natural gas. A final decision will likely be made in about six months, the minister said, adding that the priority is to use existing resources before considering new options like nuclear power.

The Asian Development Bank this week forecast that Malaysia’s annual energy demand will increase to 109 million tonnes of oil equivalent by 2035 from 73 million tonnes in 2010.

Malaysia was the world’s second-largest exporter of liquefied natural gas after Qatar in 2012, and its oil reserves are the fifth-largest in Asia Pacific and among the top-30 in the world, according to the US government’s Energy Information Administration. But Malaysia has been struggling with the cost of energy due to its high subsidy levels.

While Malaysia cuts down its nuclear plans, Vietnam is pushing ahead with its programme to build up to ten nuclear power plants until 2030.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 1 minute

The Malaysian government will shelve plans to build nuclear power plants despite rising energy needs driven by economic and population growth, the Wall Street Journal reported on October 17.

Reading Time: 1 minute

malaysia-nuclear-powerThe Malaysian government will shelve plans to build nuclear power plants despite rising energy needs driven by economic and population growth, the Wall Street Journal reported on October 17.

According to the Minister of Energy, Green Technology and Water, Maximus Johnity Ongkili, “the sentiment at the moment is not quite in favor [of nuclear power], and we need to get a lot more buy-in.”

Malaysia has long been considering plans to build two nuclear plants, in part because of growing shortages of domestic natural gas. A final decision will likely be made in about six months, the minister said, adding that the priority is to use existing resources before considering new options like nuclear power.

The Asian Development Bank this week forecast that Malaysia’s annual energy demand will increase to 109 million tonnes of oil equivalent by 2035 from 73 million tonnes in 2010.

Malaysia was the world’s second-largest exporter of liquefied natural gas after Qatar in 2012, and its oil reserves are the fifth-largest in Asia Pacific and among the top-30 in the world, according to the US government’s Energy Information Administration. But Malaysia has been struggling with the cost of energy due to its high subsidy levels.

While Malaysia cuts down its nuclear plans, Vietnam is pushing ahead with its programme to build up to ten nuclear power plants until 2030.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid