Malaysia struggles to cut down on crime wave

by -
1102
Reading Time: 2 minutes

malaysia_shootingWith street violence and shooting incidents on the rise in Malaysia, police are trying hard to become the crime wave under control.

A major crackdown has been launched from August 17 to 18, focusing on Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Negri Sembilan, where several 100 persons and vehicles were searched, according to local media.

The rise in violence is partly due to the abolition of the Emergency Ordinance in 2011, which led to 2,600 people being released from detention. However, there has also been a rise in domestic violence and abuse, reports show. The latter has been attributed to “increasingly stressed community and the rising cost of living” by women’s organisations.

To prevent “gangsterism”, Malaysia will now use a section of its Crime Prevention Act for the first time to hold suspects without filing charges. Police will use Section 105 of the act to detain suspects for as long as 24 hours without charging them.

According to a BBC report on August 19, a restaurant owner in Kuala Lumpur has now hired armed guards to protect his seafood restaurant from robberies. In Kuala Lumpur, metallic fences have been set up on street sidewalks to prevent motorcycle driver from snatching handbags of pedestrians. Glass manufacturers are offering windows that can withstand attacks from axes and are bulletproof, including car windows.

The wave of violence started in June, when Malaysian Customs deputy director-general Datuk Shaharuddin Ibrahim, 58, was shot dead at a traffic light junction in Putrajaya on on 15.

On July 27, anti-crime activist R. Sanjeevan, 29, was shot in Jempol, Negri Sembilan.

Two days later, AmBank founder Hussain Ahmad Najadi, 75, was gunned down at a car park at Lorong Ceylon in Kuala Lumpur.

Penang was rocked by three separate shootings this month alone.

A former convicted drug dealer was shot dead in broad daylight on August 8, on the same day an unidentified gunman sprayed 10 shots at a bungalow in Jalan Utama.

The next day, a club bouncer, 43, was shot at seven times outside a night club in Datuk Keramat.

One of the latest shooting in the Klang Valley took place on August 15 , when a lorry driver was shot dead at point-blank range in Kapar.

An unemployed man was killed and a woman injured in Kelantan state. There was also a shooting at the Thai border.

A primary school clerk was killed when a package he took from the top of a relative’s car exploded in Kelantan on August 16.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

With street violence and shooting incidents on the rise in Malaysia, police are trying hard to become the crime wave under control.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

malaysia_shootingWith street violence and shooting incidents on the rise in Malaysia, police are trying hard to become the crime wave under control.

A major crackdown has been launched from August 17 to 18, focusing on Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Negri Sembilan, where several 100 persons and vehicles were searched, according to local media.

The rise in violence is partly due to the abolition of the Emergency Ordinance in 2011, which led to 2,600 people being released from detention. However, there has also been a rise in domestic violence and abuse, reports show. The latter has been attributed to “increasingly stressed community and the rising cost of living” by women’s organisations.

To prevent “gangsterism”, Malaysia will now use a section of its Crime Prevention Act for the first time to hold suspects without filing charges. Police will use Section 105 of the act to detain suspects for as long as 24 hours without charging them.

According to a BBC report on August 19, a restaurant owner in Kuala Lumpur has now hired armed guards to protect his seafood restaurant from robberies. In Kuala Lumpur, metallic fences have been set up on street sidewalks to prevent motorcycle driver from snatching handbags of pedestrians. Glass manufacturers are offering windows that can withstand attacks from axes and are bulletproof, including car windows.

The wave of violence started in June, when Malaysian Customs deputy director-general Datuk Shaharuddin Ibrahim, 58, was shot dead at a traffic light junction in Putrajaya on on 15.

On July 27, anti-crime activist R. Sanjeevan, 29, was shot in Jempol, Negri Sembilan.

Two days later, AmBank founder Hussain Ahmad Najadi, 75, was gunned down at a car park at Lorong Ceylon in Kuala Lumpur.

Penang was rocked by three separate shootings this month alone.

A former convicted drug dealer was shot dead in broad daylight on August 8, on the same day an unidentified gunman sprayed 10 shots at a bungalow in Jalan Utama.

The next day, a club bouncer, 43, was shot at seven times outside a night club in Datuk Keramat.

One of the latest shooting in the Klang Valley took place on August 15 , when a lorry driver was shot dead at point-blank range in Kapar.

An unemployed man was killed and a woman injured in Kelantan state. There was also a shooting at the Thai border.

A primary school clerk was killed when a package he took from the top of a relative’s car exploded in Kelantan on August 16.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid