Malaysia’s capital markets triple

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Bursa Malaysia
Bursa Malaysia

Malaysia sticks out at as a beacon of financial prowess even when pressed up against the world’s most stellar economies. The size of capital markets in the emerging economy have tripled to RM2.5 trillion ($783 billion) since 2000, representing a whopping 264 per cent of the country’s GDP, Securities Commission Deputy Chief Executive Datuk Nik Ramlah Mahmood was quoted in The Star as saying.

A sizeable chunk of the value comes from outstanding sukuk and securities, which amounted to RM1 trillion against Bursa Malaysia’s total market capitalisation of RM1.6 trillion.

Malaysia has in recent years become the global leader of Shariah-compliant financial instruments, benefiting from the rising tide of funds that are crossing over to the alternative-banking model.

That a Southeast Asian country of over 28 million holds such global sway is an anecdote of the rise of developing nations.

“There have been seismic shifts in the structure and balance of global financial power. Many rapidly developing economies are moving up the ranks of global economic power and are seeing tremendous growth in their financial and capital markets,” Nik Ramlah said.

Malaysia also has the world’s sixth largest pension fund, The Employees Provident Fund, with RM536.5bil in assets and funds under management.

Pointing to the US’s focus on boosting the competitiveness of small businesses, Ramlah said that developing economies who follow suit are also seeing benefits.

“[I]t is the smaller companies and businesses that are the driving force behind many economies across the globe by creating jobs, generating wealth and stimulating supply-chain demand,” she told audience members.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bursa Malaysia

Malaysia sticks out at as a beacon of financial prowess even when pressed up against the world’s most stellar economies. The size of capital markets in the emerging economy have tripled to RM2.5 trillion ($783 billion) since 2000, representing a whopping 264 per cent of the country’s GDP, Securities Commission Deputy Chief Executive Datuk Nik Ramlah Mahmood was quoted in The Star as saying.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Bursa Malaysia
Bursa Malaysia

Malaysia sticks out at as a beacon of financial prowess even when pressed up against the world’s most stellar economies. The size of capital markets in the emerging economy have tripled to RM2.5 trillion ($783 billion) since 2000, representing a whopping 264 per cent of the country’s GDP, Securities Commission Deputy Chief Executive Datuk Nik Ramlah Mahmood was quoted in The Star as saying.

A sizeable chunk of the value comes from outstanding sukuk and securities, which amounted to RM1 trillion against Bursa Malaysia’s total market capitalisation of RM1.6 trillion.

Malaysia has in recent years become the global leader of Shariah-compliant financial instruments, benefiting from the rising tide of funds that are crossing over to the alternative-banking model.

That a Southeast Asian country of over 28 million holds such global sway is an anecdote of the rise of developing nations.

“There have been seismic shifts in the structure and balance of global financial power. Many rapidly developing economies are moving up the ranks of global economic power and are seeing tremendous growth in their financial and capital markets,” Nik Ramlah said.

Malaysia also has the world’s sixth largest pension fund, The Employees Provident Fund, with RM536.5bil in assets and funds under management.

Pointing to the US’s focus on boosting the competitiveness of small businesses, Ramlah said that developing economies who follow suit are also seeing benefits.

“[I]t is the smaller companies and businesses that are the driving force behind many economies across the globe by creating jobs, generating wealth and stimulating supply-chain demand,” she told audience members.

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