Mindanao ends power grid deficit

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Power lines

The rehabilitation and resumption of operations by power plants on Mindanao have brought respite to the island, where an electricity crisis perennially plagues its 22 million inhabitants.

Figure published by the National Grid Corp of the Philippines on June 10 show that Mindanao posted 68 megawatts of excess power at 1,375 megawatts of capacity on the island’s grid, over 1,307 megawatts of demand.

The National Power Corp.’s 200-megawatt Agus 6 hydroelectric plant in Lanao del Norte has been repaired and is now generating 45 megawatts, Director of Investment Promotion Romeo Montenegro of the Mindanao Development Authority told Business World.

Montenegro also said that other hydroelectric plants in the Agus and Pulangi complexes, where over 500 megawatts are generated, were also running at full capacity because the level of the rivers were above minimum requirements.

Moreover, in early June a second power generation in Misamis Oriental finished maintenance, adding its installed 100-megawatt capacity to the grid. There is also a diesel-fed plant being run by Alcantara-owned Mapalad Power Corp that has begun supplying 30 megawatts, with plans to generate at a full capacity of 98 megawatts by the third quarter of 2013.

More power is on the way in 2014, when Aboitiz Equity Ventures, the holding company of one of the Philippines’ business dynasties, begins supplying 300 megawatts of coal-fired energy through a plant on the border of Davao City and Davao del Sur.

Mindanao has longed suffered from extensive brown outs, which up until last week meant at least 30-minute power outages per day for cities across the island. Only Cagayan de Oro and Davao City have private power generators utilised by the cities, while the rest of Mindanao is at the mercy of the shaky power grid.

According to data released by the Department of Energy (DOE), about three out of ten rural Filipino households lack access to electricity as of 2010.

National electrification rates stood at 73.7 per cent, indicating that only 12.6 million households have electricity out of 17.1 million. By 2017, the DOE sees the country’s electrification rate at 90 per cent with the start of an electrification programme in 2011.

On Mindanao, power prospects have been generally sour, as dry seasons bring large drops in generation from the hydro plants that supply a lion’s share of energy to the power grid. During the last dry spell in 2010, Mindanao’s power generation dropped to 700 megawatts, or about 500 to 600 megawatts short of demand.

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Power lines

The rehabilitation and resumption of operations by power plants on Mindanao have brought respite to the island, where an electricity crisis perennially plagues its 22 million inhabitants.

Figure published by the National Grid Corp of the Philippines on June 10 show that Mindanao posted 68 megawatts of excess power at 1,375 megawatts of capacity on the island’s grid, over 1,307 megawatts of demand.

The National Power Corp.’s 200-megawatt Agus 6 hydroelectric plant in Lanao del Norte has been repaired and is now generating 45 megawatts, Director of Investment Promotion Romeo Montenegro of the Mindanao Development Authority told Business World.

Montenegro also said that other hydroelectric plants in the Agus and Pulangi complexes, where over 500 megawatts are generated, were also running at full capacity because the level of the rivers were above minimum requirements.

Moreover, in early June a second power generation in Misamis Oriental finished maintenance, adding its installed 100-megawatt capacity to the grid. There is also a diesel-fed plant being run by Alcantara-owned Mapalad Power Corp that has begun supplying 30 megawatts, with plans to generate at a full capacity of 98 megawatts by the third quarter of 2013.

More power is on the way in 2014, when Aboitiz Equity Ventures, the holding company of one of the Philippines’ business dynasties, begins supplying 300 megawatts of coal-fired energy through a plant on the border of Davao City and Davao del Sur.

Mindanao has longed suffered from extensive brown outs, which up until last week meant at least 30-minute power outages per day for cities across the island. Only Cagayan de Oro and Davao City have private power generators utilised by the cities, while the rest of Mindanao is at the mercy of the shaky power grid.

According to data released by the Department of Energy (DOE), about three out of ten rural Filipino households lack access to electricity as of 2010.

National electrification rates stood at 73.7 per cent, indicating that only 12.6 million households have electricity out of 17.1 million. By 2017, the DOE sees the country’s electrification rate at 90 per cent with the start of an electrification programme in 2011.

On Mindanao, power prospects have been generally sour, as dry seasons bring large drops in generation from the hydro plants that supply a lion’s share of energy to the power grid. During the last dry spell in 2010, Mindanao’s power generation dropped to 700 megawatts, or about 500 to 600 megawatts short of demand.

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid