Miri Port seeks major upgrades in bid to become regional player

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Miri Port in the northern part of Sarawak has grand ambitions to become one of the leading ports in Malaysia and they are looking for investors to help them achieve their lofty goals.

The Port’s General Manager Shebli Hairani said the shallow access channel at the Baram River mouth, which can go down to only one metre during low tide and rise to three metres, means bigger vessels are unable to dock at the facility.

However, the Port management recently made a major breakthrough when it successfully secured federal funding to conduct a detailed study on upgrading the Port in order to cater for large ships.

“There is a need for Miri to have a port at least beyond eight metres deep so we can cater for own traffic and cargo and facilitate the growth of trade in this hinterland,” said Mr Shebli.  “We are delighted to have secured federal funding, which is not easy to get, to conduct a study into how we can make the port deeper.”

Mr Shebli said the results of the study are likely to be known around June 2012. Should the study find that the proposed upgrades are viable, Miri Port would then search for investors to fund the venture, with Middle Eastern interests welcome to participate.

“We will be looking at some funding options,” he said. “Upgrading the port is crucial to Miri’s economic growth.”

Miri boasts thriving timber and palm oil industries and much of the products manufactured in the area make their way to peninsular Malaysia and abroad via Miri Port. In the first six months of 2011, the Port handled more than 500,000 tonnes of cargo and is poised to surpass its 2008 record of more than 870,000 tonnes.

“Timber is exported midstream to mainly Far East destinations such as China, Hong Kong and Japan,” said Mr Shebli. “So, you can see that all the industries here are coming up.”

Mr Shebli said Miri Port’s ability to survive without government funding despite its limitations proves that it has the management skills to work wonders with a deep-water port.

“Although we are under the government’s framework, we are like a private company in that we have to be self-sufficient,” he said.

“And even with the serious constraints, we have managed to sustain the Port. It shows you how hard we work.”

He added that an upgraded Miri Port, which has won a number of domestic and international awards, would be a perfect complement to the activities of the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE), which is about 200 kilometres away.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Miri Port in the northern part of Sarawak has grand ambitions to become one of the leading ports in Malaysia and they are looking for investors to help them achieve their lofty goals.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Miri Port in the northern part of Sarawak has grand ambitions to become one of the leading ports in Malaysia and they are looking for investors to help them achieve their lofty goals.

The Port’s General Manager Shebli Hairani said the shallow access channel at the Baram River mouth, which can go down to only one metre during low tide and rise to three metres, means bigger vessels are unable to dock at the facility.

However, the Port management recently made a major breakthrough when it successfully secured federal funding to conduct a detailed study on upgrading the Port in order to cater for large ships.

“There is a need for Miri to have a port at least beyond eight metres deep so we can cater for own traffic and cargo and facilitate the growth of trade in this hinterland,” said Mr Shebli.  “We are delighted to have secured federal funding, which is not easy to get, to conduct a study into how we can make the port deeper.”

Mr Shebli said the results of the study are likely to be known around June 2012. Should the study find that the proposed upgrades are viable, Miri Port would then search for investors to fund the venture, with Middle Eastern interests welcome to participate.

“We will be looking at some funding options,” he said. “Upgrading the port is crucial to Miri’s economic growth.”

Miri boasts thriving timber and palm oil industries and much of the products manufactured in the area make their way to peninsular Malaysia and abroad via Miri Port. In the first six months of 2011, the Port handled more than 500,000 tonnes of cargo and is poised to surpass its 2008 record of more than 870,000 tonnes.

“Timber is exported midstream to mainly Far East destinations such as China, Hong Kong and Japan,” said Mr Shebli. “So, you can see that all the industries here are coming up.”

Mr Shebli said Miri Port’s ability to survive without government funding despite its limitations proves that it has the management skills to work wonders with a deep-water port.

“Although we are under the government’s framework, we are like a private company in that we have to be self-sufficient,” he said.

“And even with the serious constraints, we have managed to sustain the Port. It shows you how hard we work.”

He added that an upgraded Miri Port, which has won a number of domestic and international awards, would be a perfect complement to the activities of the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE), which is about 200 kilometres away.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid