Morocco leads smart city trend in North Africa

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Eco-friendly, data-controlled tram in Rabat, Morocco
Eco-friendly, data-controlled tram in Rabat, Morocco

Urban growth is pronounced in North Africa and Western Asia – a region that includes Middle East, Turkey and the Caucasus – where the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs estimates that city dwellers will account for 66 per cent of the population by 2025 alone.

This is where Morocco serves as an example. Over the past 50 years, the country has introduced numerous political and social reforms that have laid the foundations for economic growth. King Mohamed VI has actively pursued a policy of decentralisation, empowering provinces and municipalities to better respond to the economic, social, cultural and environmental needs of their communities and encouraging citizens to actively participate in local governance.

The government has also liberalised media outlets and made universal access to digital technology an objective, partnering with banking institutions to implement its ambitious digital plan Maroc Numérique 2013 (Digital Morocco 2013). These political and institutional changes have already begun transforming the Moroccan economy, which in turn is increasingly attracting foreign investors and stimulating growth.

Morocco is now working towards numerous major reforms in urban planning, clean energy, water security, agricultural development, and transportation.The time is thus ripe for policymakers to plan for smart initiatives that will help modernise the nation and serve as an example to the rest of North Africa.

The first International Summit for Smart Cities in North Africa will be held from June 9 to 10, 2014,in Ifrane near Fez in Morocco. It is a follow up to the 2013 smart city conference at the Institute for Information Technologies and Societies (IITS) in Quebec City, Canada.

The purpose of this two-day event is to find innovative and actionable solutions for urban living within the North African geopolitical context. To accomplish this, the Summit focuses on connecting illustrious minds from the international community, notably North America, with influential policy makers in North Africa, allowing them to work together on key issues like information and communications technologies , innovation, and sustainability.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Eco-friendly, data-controlled tram in Rabat, Morocco

Urban growth is pronounced in North Africa and Western Asia – a region that includes Middle East, Turkey and the Caucasus – where the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs estimates that city dwellers will account for 66 per cent of the population by 2025 alone.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Eco-friendly, data-controlled tram in Rabat, Morocco
Eco-friendly, data-controlled tram in Rabat, Morocco

Urban growth is pronounced in North Africa and Western Asia – a region that includes Middle East, Turkey and the Caucasus – where the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs estimates that city dwellers will account for 66 per cent of the population by 2025 alone.

This is where Morocco serves as an example. Over the past 50 years, the country has introduced numerous political and social reforms that have laid the foundations for economic growth. King Mohamed VI has actively pursued a policy of decentralisation, empowering provinces and municipalities to better respond to the economic, social, cultural and environmental needs of their communities and encouraging citizens to actively participate in local governance.

The government has also liberalised media outlets and made universal access to digital technology an objective, partnering with banking institutions to implement its ambitious digital plan Maroc Numérique 2013 (Digital Morocco 2013). These political and institutional changes have already begun transforming the Moroccan economy, which in turn is increasingly attracting foreign investors and stimulating growth.

Morocco is now working towards numerous major reforms in urban planning, clean energy, water security, agricultural development, and transportation.The time is thus ripe for policymakers to plan for smart initiatives that will help modernise the nation and serve as an example to the rest of North Africa.

The first International Summit for Smart Cities in North Africa will be held from June 9 to 10, 2014,in Ifrane near Fez in Morocco. It is a follow up to the 2013 smart city conference at the Institute for Information Technologies and Societies (IITS) in Quebec City, Canada.

The purpose of this two-day event is to find innovative and actionable solutions for urban living within the North African geopolitical context. To accomplish this, the Summit focuses on connecting illustrious minds from the international community, notably North America, with influential policy makers in North Africa, allowing them to work together on key issues like information and communications technologies , innovation, and sustainability.

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