Myanmar launches $500m tourism plan

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Yangon pagodaMyanmar has drawn up a master tourism plan that includes 38 developmental projects worth nearly $500 million in an effort to boost the tourism sector’s competitiveness, project environmentally important areas and safeguard ethnic communities, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) announced in a statement on June 5.

“This master plan outlines a path to welcoming more visitors to Myanmar without threatening our unique cultural heritage or endangering pristine environments,” said U Htay Aung, Myanmar’s Minister for Hotels and Tourism, at the unveiling of the tourism plan, which included the Norwegian government and ADB as observers.

With EU- and US-imposed sanctions widely dropped, Myanmar is forecast to continue experiencing a raft of visitors after growing 55 per cent in 2012, placing added pressure on its already stressed infrastructure. Indeed, tourist arrivals in Myanmar topped the 1 million mark for the first time ever in 2012, and that number is expected to reach 1.3 million this year.

It is believed that if the torrent of reforms that has brought Myanmar back to global credibility can be sustained, tourist arrivals would continue to grow seven-fold to 7.5 million by 2020, bringing in tourism receipts worth $10.1 billion in the process.

According to the ADB, under a high-growth scenario, the tourism sector could create as much as 1.4 million jobs in Myanmar.

“Tourism will be a pillar of Myanmar’s economy, and it has the potential to create meaningful job opportunities for the country’s people, including those living in poor communities,” said ADB Vice President Stephen Groff.

“This [tourism master] plan is a long-term vision, and a solid start to ensuring tourism contributes to equitable social and economic development in Myanmar.”

This trend looks to already be on the way. Yangon witnessed a 44 per cent rise in foreign arrivals during the first four months of 2013, according to official data, and hotel chains are hotly eying the market.

Thailand, China, Japan, the US, and South Korea making up the bulk of visitors, followed by France, Germany, Malaysia, Singapore, and the UK.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Myanmar has drawn up a master tourism plan that includes 38 developmental projects worth nearly $500 million in an effort to boost the tourism sector’s competitiveness, project environmentally important areas and safeguard ethnic communities, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) announced in a statement on June 5.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Yangon pagodaMyanmar has drawn up a master tourism plan that includes 38 developmental projects worth nearly $500 million in an effort to boost the tourism sector’s competitiveness, project environmentally important areas and safeguard ethnic communities, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) announced in a statement on June 5.

“This master plan outlines a path to welcoming more visitors to Myanmar without threatening our unique cultural heritage or endangering pristine environments,” said U Htay Aung, Myanmar’s Minister for Hotels and Tourism, at the unveiling of the tourism plan, which included the Norwegian government and ADB as observers.

With EU- and US-imposed sanctions widely dropped, Myanmar is forecast to continue experiencing a raft of visitors after growing 55 per cent in 2012, placing added pressure on its already stressed infrastructure. Indeed, tourist arrivals in Myanmar topped the 1 million mark for the first time ever in 2012, and that number is expected to reach 1.3 million this year.

It is believed that if the torrent of reforms that has brought Myanmar back to global credibility can be sustained, tourist arrivals would continue to grow seven-fold to 7.5 million by 2020, bringing in tourism receipts worth $10.1 billion in the process.

According to the ADB, under a high-growth scenario, the tourism sector could create as much as 1.4 million jobs in Myanmar.

“Tourism will be a pillar of Myanmar’s economy, and it has the potential to create meaningful job opportunities for the country’s people, including those living in poor communities,” said ADB Vice President Stephen Groff.

“This [tourism master] plan is a long-term vision, and a solid start to ensuring tourism contributes to equitable social and economic development in Myanmar.”

This trend looks to already be on the way. Yangon witnessed a 44 per cent rise in foreign arrivals during the first four months of 2013, according to official data, and hotel chains are hotly eying the market.

Thailand, China, Japan, the US, and South Korea making up the bulk of visitors, followed by France, Germany, Malaysia, Singapore, and the UK.

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