Myanmar monks call for Ooredoo boycott

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ooredoo myanmarA group of Buddhist monks in Myanmar has called for a boycott of mobile phone network operator Ooredoo because the company is from a Muslim country, namely Qatar.

Reports on June 6 said that extremist monks are mobilising to restrict religious freedom and discourage citizens from making use of Muslim-owned shops and businesses.

“We want Buddhists to buy things only from shops owned by those of our religion and the profits should go to our religion,” said Parmuakha, a monk who is one of the organisers of a campaign against Ooredoo.

He condemned Myanmar’s government for issuing Ooredoo with a mobile license earlier this year.

The Qatar based telco and Norway’s Telenor in January became the first foreign, privately-owned telcos to receive operating licences in Myanmar, a country where the high price of SIM cards has kept mobile penetration below 10 per cent. Ooredoo plans to launch services in the third quarter of 2014.

A spokeswoman for the telco played down the significance of the monks’ opposition.

“I think any suspicion about our company will quickly dissipate once people start to see more of our brand and the positive effects that we will bring to the people of Myanmar,” she said.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

A group of Buddhist monks in Myanmar has called for a boycott of mobile phone network operator Ooredoo because the company is from a Muslim country, namely Qatar.

Reading Time: 1 minute

ooredoo myanmarA group of Buddhist monks in Myanmar has called for a boycott of mobile phone network operator Ooredoo because the company is from a Muslim country, namely Qatar.

Reports on June 6 said that extremist monks are mobilising to restrict religious freedom and discourage citizens from making use of Muslim-owned shops and businesses.

“We want Buddhists to buy things only from shops owned by those of our religion and the profits should go to our religion,” said Parmuakha, a monk who is one of the organisers of a campaign against Ooredoo.

He condemned Myanmar’s government for issuing Ooredoo with a mobile license earlier this year.

The Qatar based telco and Norway’s Telenor in January became the first foreign, privately-owned telcos to receive operating licences in Myanmar, a country where the high price of SIM cards has kept mobile penetration below 10 per cent. Ooredoo plans to launch services in the third quarter of 2014.

A spokeswoman for the telco played down the significance of the monks’ opposition.

“I think any suspicion about our company will quickly dissipate once people start to see more of our brand and the positive effects that we will bring to the people of Myanmar,” she said.

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