Myanmar pledges to free all political prisoners

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UK Prime Minister meets Myanmar President Thein Sein in London on July 15

In Myanmar’s next wave of historical reforms, the former pariah nation has not only owned up to harbouring prisoners incarcerated due to their beliefs, but also issued a guarantee to set matters straight.

By year’s end, President Thein Sein proclaimed on July 15 in London, after talks with UK Prime Minster David Cameron, all remaining political prisoners in Myanmar will be freed.

“Zero tolerance,” added the president, will be given to those for ethically driven violence, which has exploded over the past year as Buddhists run down Muslim minorities on the country’s western borderlands. The outbursts have been viewed in part as a sign of darker movements roiling beneath the surface.

The reassurance is unusual given Myanmar’s continued attachment to strong-armed military policies, which includes the use of mines, a weapon Myanmar considers a military asset instead of a humanitarian disaster.

Indeed, Myanmar bears the dishonourable distinction of being of the only country in the world to never sign the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty.

The president’s assertion can nonetheless be viewed as a bonus for the deluge of investors that have opened up new branches and plowed in tons of cash. Political instability and ongoing communal violence can prove to be derailing forces if not assiduously handled.

President Sein seems to know this. By granting greater freedoms to Myanmar, he has already instigated an awakening in his economy that could never have been imaged by the dictators of the former military junta, nor those who actively opposed it.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

UK Prime Minister meets Myanmar President Thein Sein in London on July 15

In Myanmar’s next wave of historical reforms, the former pariah nation has not only owned up to harbouring prisoners incarcerated due to their beliefs, but also issued a guarantee to set matters straight.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

David+Cameron+meets+President+Thein+Sein+Burma+ICgMuCfji1il
UK Prime Minister meets Myanmar President Thein Sein in London on July 15

In Myanmar’s next wave of historical reforms, the former pariah nation has not only owned up to harbouring prisoners incarcerated due to their beliefs, but also issued a guarantee to set matters straight.

By year’s end, President Thein Sein proclaimed on July 15 in London, after talks with UK Prime Minster David Cameron, all remaining political prisoners in Myanmar will be freed.

“Zero tolerance,” added the president, will be given to those for ethically driven violence, which has exploded over the past year as Buddhists run down Muslim minorities on the country’s western borderlands. The outbursts have been viewed in part as a sign of darker movements roiling beneath the surface.

The reassurance is unusual given Myanmar’s continued attachment to strong-armed military policies, which includes the use of mines, a weapon Myanmar considers a military asset instead of a humanitarian disaster.

Indeed, Myanmar bears the dishonourable distinction of being of the only country in the world to never sign the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty.

The president’s assertion can nonetheless be viewed as a bonus for the deluge of investors that have opened up new branches and plowed in tons of cash. Political instability and ongoing communal violence can prove to be derailing forces if not assiduously handled.

President Sein seems to know this. By granting greater freedoms to Myanmar, he has already instigated an awakening in his economy that could never have been imaged by the dictators of the former military junta, nor those who actively opposed it.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
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