Myanmar to set up anti-corruption commission

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kyat corruptionMyanmar will “soon” set up an anti-corruption commission comprised of 15 lesser-known former public servants, according to a message sent by the president to Parliament on February 20, Eleven Myanmar reported.

The President and parliamentary chairpersons (lower and upper) nominated five members each to the commission, which will be approved by the parliament, the message said.

According to the law, Myanmar nationals aged at least 45 years and no older than 70 can be elected as members of the commission, by the president and parliamentary chairpersons, assuming that they are honest and moral.

The anti-corruption law enacted last year has provided that the commission’s period of service must be the same as the president’s, with only two terms to serve.

The law aims to get rid of corruption in the country as a national duty, to create a clean and fair government that can take dutiful and graceful responsibility for public administration, to protect everyone in the country from losses related to corruption, to take effective action against corrupt public officials, help the country’s economic development and attract foreign investment.

The commission would be comprised of former government staff whose previous work is less known to the public. Analysts say their assets should be disclosed and publicized.

President Thein Sein also formed a working committee for anti-corruption on January 8 last year, with Vice President Sai Mouk Kham as its chair. Its members included Lieutenant General Ko Ko from the Ministry of Home Affairs; Ministers Thein Nyunt, Soe Thein and Tin Naing Thein from the President’s Office Ministry; Attorney General Tun Shin; and Than Kyaw, legal adviser to the president. Director General Hla Tun from the President’s Office served as its secretary.

Vice President Sai Mauk Kham, at a workshop held in Nay Pyi Taw recently, said it is a regretful situation for Myanmar when corruption becomes like a culture.

President Thein Sein, during the government’s inaugural meeting on March 31, 2011, stressed that matters of bribery and corruption most common in government departments must be fought effectively.

Transparency International ranked Myanmar 157 out of 177 countries in its annual survey of corruption perceptions last year.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Myanmar will “soon” set up an anti-corruption commission comprised of 15 lesser-known former public servants, according to a message sent by the president to Parliament on February 20, Eleven Myanmar reported.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

kyat corruptionMyanmar will “soon” set up an anti-corruption commission comprised of 15 lesser-known former public servants, according to a message sent by the president to Parliament on February 20, Eleven Myanmar reported.

The President and parliamentary chairpersons (lower and upper) nominated five members each to the commission, which will be approved by the parliament, the message said.

According to the law, Myanmar nationals aged at least 45 years and no older than 70 can be elected as members of the commission, by the president and parliamentary chairpersons, assuming that they are honest and moral.

The anti-corruption law enacted last year has provided that the commission’s period of service must be the same as the president’s, with only two terms to serve.

The law aims to get rid of corruption in the country as a national duty, to create a clean and fair government that can take dutiful and graceful responsibility for public administration, to protect everyone in the country from losses related to corruption, to take effective action against corrupt public officials, help the country’s economic development and attract foreign investment.

The commission would be comprised of former government staff whose previous work is less known to the public. Analysts say their assets should be disclosed and publicized.

President Thein Sein also formed a working committee for anti-corruption on January 8 last year, with Vice President Sai Mouk Kham as its chair. Its members included Lieutenant General Ko Ko from the Ministry of Home Affairs; Ministers Thein Nyunt, Soe Thein and Tin Naing Thein from the President’s Office Ministry; Attorney General Tun Shin; and Than Kyaw, legal adviser to the president. Director General Hla Tun from the President’s Office served as its secretary.

Vice President Sai Mauk Kham, at a workshop held in Nay Pyi Taw recently, said it is a regretful situation for Myanmar when corruption becomes like a culture.

President Thein Sein, during the government’s inaugural meeting on March 31, 2011, stressed that matters of bribery and corruption most common in government departments must be fought effectively.

Transparency International ranked Myanmar 157 out of 177 countries in its annual survey of corruption perceptions last year.

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