Myanmar’s telecom courts Japanese partner

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myanmar_telecomJapan’s KDDI Corp and Sumitomo Corp are likely to become a partner of Myanmar’s state-owned telecommunications operator Myanmar Post and Telecommunication (MPT), which seeks to expand services in one of the world’s least-connected countries, Reuters reported.

Sumitomo’s deputy general manager in Myanmar, Soe Kyu, said the companies were jointly invited into “exclusive” talks about becoming the international partner of MPT by sharing its existing license.

MPT is currently the country’s sole telecoms operator as well as the industry’s regulator. The government plans to create a new regulator by 2015 and will divest a part of MPT but will retain a majority stake. That company, with a new name, will be one of four licensed operators.

State-backed Yatanarpon, primarily an Internet service provider until now, also holds a license. Norway’s Telenor and Qatar’s Ooredoo won the hotly contested bidding for two new licenses in June 2013, but are still waiting for final approval before starting to roll out their networks.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Japan’s KDDI Corp and Sumitomo Corp are likely to become a partner of Myanmar’s state-owned telecommunications operator Myanmar Post and Telecommunication (MPT), which seeks to expand services in one of the world’s least-connected countries, Reuters reported.

Reading Time: 1 minute

myanmar_telecomJapan’s KDDI Corp and Sumitomo Corp are likely to become a partner of Myanmar’s state-owned telecommunications operator Myanmar Post and Telecommunication (MPT), which seeks to expand services in one of the world’s least-connected countries, Reuters reported.

Sumitomo’s deputy general manager in Myanmar, Soe Kyu, said the companies were jointly invited into “exclusive” talks about becoming the international partner of MPT by sharing its existing license.

MPT is currently the country’s sole telecoms operator as well as the industry’s regulator. The government plans to create a new regulator by 2015 and will divest a part of MPT but will retain a majority stake. That company, with a new name, will be one of four licensed operators.

State-backed Yatanarpon, primarily an Internet service provider until now, also holds a license. Norway’s Telenor and Qatar’s Ooredoo won the hotly contested bidding for two new licenses in June 2013, but are still waiting for final approval before starting to roll out their networks.

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