Najib to aid Sarawak’s infrastructure

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Najib PM Malaysia
Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Adbul Tun Razak

Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Adbul Tun Razak has reaffirmed Sarawak that the federal government will push the agenda of building community-driven infrastructure in the state’s rural areas.

The ensuring extension of cooperation made by Prime Minster Najib during a dialogue with Sarawak Chief Minister Taib Mahmud on March 11 comes amid concern from foreign investors that accommodation and community amenities for workers in the state’s far-flung industrial regions are not adequate enough.

“It is the federal government aim to continue to cooperate with the Sarawak government so that the rural transformation agenda can be implemented using the big allocation provided via the National Key Result Areas by constructing schools, health centres and so on,” Prime Minister Najib was quoted as saying in the Borneo Post.

“This is done by achieving high growth rate in the range of 5 to 6 per cent per annum. The increased revenue can be distributed to close the development gap between Sarawak and the peninsula,” Najib added.

Growing through challenges

Tokuyama, is a Japanese manufacture of raw materials, including inorganic and organic chemicals, cement and building materials, has noted inaccessibility to the Samalaju Industrial Park, a complex in the northeast of the state, as a major challenge for its workers, as well as the immature nature of the park’s development.

“There should also be a sense of a township within Samalaju, including all the necessary amenities,” said Managing Director and President Akira Sanuki, adding that workers constructing Tokuyama’s second factory have to take 15 buses daily to a site down an access road that is 80-per cent single lane.

However, the future prospects of production for the foreign entrant look bright with the possibility of exporting higher-end materials to China and Taiwan.

“There is the possibility for Malaysia to become a direct downstream candidate,” Sanuki said.

“If [the factory construction] goes as planned then we will be at a capacity of 20,000 tonnes per year,” he concluded.

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Adbul Tun Razak

Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Adbul Tun Razak has reaffirmed Sarawak that the federal government will push the agenda of building community-driven infrastructure in the state’s rural areas.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Najib PM Malaysia
Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Adbul Tun Razak

Malaysian Prime Minster Najib Adbul Tun Razak has reaffirmed Sarawak that the federal government will push the agenda of building community-driven infrastructure in the state’s rural areas.

The ensuring extension of cooperation made by Prime Minster Najib during a dialogue with Sarawak Chief Minister Taib Mahmud on March 11 comes amid concern from foreign investors that accommodation and community amenities for workers in the state’s far-flung industrial regions are not adequate enough.

“It is the federal government aim to continue to cooperate with the Sarawak government so that the rural transformation agenda can be implemented using the big allocation provided via the National Key Result Areas by constructing schools, health centres and so on,” Prime Minister Najib was quoted as saying in the Borneo Post.

“This is done by achieving high growth rate in the range of 5 to 6 per cent per annum. The increased revenue can be distributed to close the development gap between Sarawak and the peninsula,” Najib added.

Growing through challenges

Tokuyama, is a Japanese manufacture of raw materials, including inorganic and organic chemicals, cement and building materials, has noted inaccessibility to the Samalaju Industrial Park, a complex in the northeast of the state, as a major challenge for its workers, as well as the immature nature of the park’s development.

“There should also be a sense of a township within Samalaju, including all the necessary amenities,” said Managing Director and President Akira Sanuki, adding that workers constructing Tokuyama’s second factory have to take 15 buses daily to a site down an access road that is 80-per cent single lane.

However, the future prospects of production for the foreign entrant look bright with the possibility of exporting higher-end materials to China and Taiwan.

“There is the possibility for Malaysia to become a direct downstream candidate,” Sanuki said.

“If [the factory construction] goes as planned then we will be at a capacity of 20,000 tonnes per year,” he concluded.

 

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