New data backbone links East Asia

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A ship laying a submarine cable in the South China Sea

The new 7,800 kilometer data connection Asia Submarine-Cable Express (ASE) has been opened for Internet traffic on August 11 in an aim to boost the speed of data being transferred across ASEAN and other East Asian metropolises.

The $400 million project has been carried out by a consortium of major telecom companies in the region, NTTCom of Japan, StarHub of Singapore, TM of Malaysia and Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company, and was supplied by NEC Corp and Fujitsu.

The cable currently has landing points in Japan, the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia and will add Hong Kong in the first quarter of 2013. At a later stage it is planned to be expanded to China, Vietnam, Brunei and Indonesia. Via data hubs, it is also linked to major other cable systems such as the SEA-ME-WE3, which runs from Japan along China’s coast, and the Asia-America Gateway, which connects the US West Coast with Hong Kong, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia.
The ASE cable will be connected to more landing stations in the region in the near future (Click to enlarge)

The new cable delivers data via an optical fiber system at 40 gigabits per second and is three milliseconds faster than any other existing cable connection between Singapore with Tokyo. It is also connected directly to the Serangoon Data Center in Singapore, the city state’s main data landing hub, and later will also connect to the Hong Kong Financial Data Center. A speed of 40 gigabits per second means that an average HD DVD can be downloaded in 1.8 seconds. The cable can be upgraded to 100 gigabits per second, the operator said.

The cable route was designed to avoid earthquake-prone seas in the region which the cable systems of other carriers pass through. In 2006, a strong earthquake off the southwest coast of Taiwan damaged several undersea cables and disrupted telecoms services in several Asian countries, and in 2011 the earthquake cum tsunami that hit Japan also destroyed several submarine cable connections.
The ASE cable will not only provide better connectivity for general data transfer in the region, it will also speed up computer trading in particular for those brokers who use high-frequency trading programmes at the stock exchanges in Tokyo, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, where investment decision are made in milliseconds and where data connectivity decides about success or failure of a trade.
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Reading Time: 2 minutes

A ship laying a submarine cable in the South China Sea

The new 7,800 kilometer data connection Asia Submarine-Cable Express (ASE) has been opened for Internet traffic on August 11 in an aim to boost the speed of data being transferred across ASEAN and other East Asian metropolises.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

A ship laying a submarine cable in the South China Sea

The new 7,800 kilometer data connection Asia Submarine-Cable Express (ASE) has been opened for Internet traffic on August 11 in an aim to boost the speed of data being transferred across ASEAN and other East Asian metropolises.

The $400 million project has been carried out by a consortium of major telecom companies in the region, NTTCom of Japan, StarHub of Singapore, TM of Malaysia and Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company, and was supplied by NEC Corp and Fujitsu.

The cable currently has landing points in Japan, the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia and will add Hong Kong in the first quarter of 2013. At a later stage it is planned to be expanded to China, Vietnam, Brunei and Indonesia. Via data hubs, it is also linked to major other cable systems such as the SEA-ME-WE3, which runs from Japan along China’s coast, and the Asia-America Gateway, which connects the US West Coast with Hong Kong, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia.
The ASE cable will be connected to more landing stations in the region in the near future (Click to enlarge)

The new cable delivers data via an optical fiber system at 40 gigabits per second and is three milliseconds faster than any other existing cable connection between Singapore with Tokyo. It is also connected directly to the Serangoon Data Center in Singapore, the city state’s main data landing hub, and later will also connect to the Hong Kong Financial Data Center. A speed of 40 gigabits per second means that an average HD DVD can be downloaded in 1.8 seconds. The cable can be upgraded to 100 gigabits per second, the operator said.

The cable route was designed to avoid earthquake-prone seas in the region which the cable systems of other carriers pass through. In 2006, a strong earthquake off the southwest coast of Taiwan damaged several undersea cables and disrupted telecoms services in several Asian countries, and in 2011 the earthquake cum tsunami that hit Japan also destroyed several submarine cable connections.
The ASE cable will not only provide better connectivity for general data transfer in the region, it will also speed up computer trading in particular for those brokers who use high-frequency trading programmes at the stock exchanges in Tokyo, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, where investment decision are made in milliseconds and where data connectivity decides about success or failure of a trade.
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