New guidebook for Chinese tourists out

Reading Time: 2 minutes

guidebookThe Chinese National Tourism Administration publicised its 64-page Guidebook for Civilised Tourism – with illustrations to accompany its list of dos and don’ts –  ahead of a “Golden Week” public holiday that started on October 2.

In the guidebook, Chinese nationals that are visiting other countries have been warned by their government of behaviour such as not to urinate in swimming pools or pick their noses in the public.

The new guidance for Chinese tourists came as a result of perceived bad behaviour from them after stories they had vandalised a temple in Egypt and offended North Koreans by “feeding their children sweets as if they were ducks”.

A mainland Chinese woman who in February 2013 had her son relieve himself in a bottle in a crowded Hong Kong restaurant sparked an outpouring of anger online, with some locals deriding mainlanders as “locusts”.

Chinese tourists are also advised to keep their nose-hair neatly trimmed and, if they had to pick their teeth, never to use their fingers. They are also urged not to occupy public toilets for long periods of time or leave footprints on the toilet seat.

Travelers should not drink soup straight from the bowl or make slurping sounds when eating noodles. And after taking a flight they must leave the life jackets underneath their seats, the rulebook said, explaining that “if a dangerous situation arises then someone else will not have a life jacket”.

In Germany, the guidebook says it is frowned upon to snap fingers at humans as if they were dogs. Women in Spain should always wear earrings in public – or else be considered effectively naked, the guidebook says. Visitors to Japan were advised to avoid fidgeting with hair or clothes in restaurants.

The World Trade Organisation named China the new number one nation for expenditure when traveling abroad. Chinese expenditure abroad reached $102 billion in 2012 and the volume of international trips by Chinese travelers reached 83 million, up from 10 million in 2000.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Chinese National Tourism Administration publicised its 64-page Guidebook for Civilised Tourism – with illustrations to accompany its list of dos and don’ts –  ahead of a “Golden Week” public holiday that started on October 2.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

guidebookThe Chinese National Tourism Administration publicised its 64-page Guidebook for Civilised Tourism – with illustrations to accompany its list of dos and don’ts –  ahead of a “Golden Week” public holiday that started on October 2.

In the guidebook, Chinese nationals that are visiting other countries have been warned by their government of behaviour such as not to urinate in swimming pools or pick their noses in the public.

The new guidance for Chinese tourists came as a result of perceived bad behaviour from them after stories they had vandalised a temple in Egypt and offended North Koreans by “feeding their children sweets as if they were ducks”.

A mainland Chinese woman who in February 2013 had her son relieve himself in a bottle in a crowded Hong Kong restaurant sparked an outpouring of anger online, with some locals deriding mainlanders as “locusts”.

Chinese tourists are also advised to keep their nose-hair neatly trimmed and, if they had to pick their teeth, never to use their fingers. They are also urged not to occupy public toilets for long periods of time or leave footprints on the toilet seat.

Travelers should not drink soup straight from the bowl or make slurping sounds when eating noodles. And after taking a flight they must leave the life jackets underneath their seats, the rulebook said, explaining that “if a dangerous situation arises then someone else will not have a life jacket”.

In Germany, the guidebook says it is frowned upon to snap fingers at humans as if they were dogs. Women in Spain should always wear earrings in public – or else be considered effectively naked, the guidebook says. Visitors to Japan were advised to avoid fidgeting with hair or clothes in restaurants.

The World Trade Organisation named China the new number one nation for expenditure when traveling abroad. Chinese expenditure abroad reached $102 billion in 2012 and the volume of international trips by Chinese travelers reached 83 million, up from 10 million in 2000.

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