Phil polls live: Aquino’s reforms get tested

Reading Time: 3 minutes

comelecSome 52 million registered voters are expected to head to the polls today, May 13, to vote for over 18,000 positions in what is being seen as a referendum on President Benigno Aquino III’s economic and political reforms.

The results will be known “in 48 hours or less,” the election commission has stated.

Approval ratings have been consistently high for President Aquino since he took office in 2010, built on the momentum his administration has created by promising to weed out corrupt officials, revitalise the laggard economy and improve the country’s negatively perceived business climate. Adding to his administration’s confidence, Aquino has three recent investment credit upgrades and growth of 6.6 per cent in 2012 to stand behind.

But in his voracious drive to snuff out former foes branded a corrupt villains, Aquino has been cross-checked for not concentrating hard enough on the country’s major blights: endemic poverty and a lack of jobs.

It can be said that today’s midterm election is more about personalities than platforms, with this year’s ballot featuring some astounding comebacks.

Former Philippine president and one-time Manila mayor, Joseph Estrada is now back on the ballot contending for the capital’s mayoral position once again.

Imelda Marcos has lured supporters back to her camp in Ilocos Norte to support her for a second term representing the northern Luzon province.

That Marcos was accused of laundering billions of dollars when her late husband ruled over the Philippines with an iron fist yet has never come to trial is stark evidence of just how far Aquino’s drive to rid corruption in the nation has left to go.

“Imelda Marcos has no actual power. She may win again but she is an outcast in Manila,” a member of the presidential team PNoy told Inside Investor.

During a trip to a polling station in Makati, Inside Investor observed that transparent measures were being taken to ensure free and fair elections.

Unlike recent elections in Malaysia, the dueling parties were not given unfair advertising space in the station, and the country’s electoral commission has been forthcoming with reporting incidences of power shortage and mechanical failures so far across the country.

Some photographic impressions from a polling station in Makati (© Oliver Ellerton):

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IMG_3152

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Reading Time: 3 minutes

Some 52 million registered voters are expected to head to the polls today, May 13, to vote for over 18,000 positions in what is being seen as a referendum on President Benigno Aquino III’s economic and political reforms.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

comelecSome 52 million registered voters are expected to head to the polls today, May 13, to vote for over 18,000 positions in what is being seen as a referendum on President Benigno Aquino III’s economic and political reforms.

The results will be known “in 48 hours or less,” the election commission has stated.

Approval ratings have been consistently high for President Aquino since he took office in 2010, built on the momentum his administration has created by promising to weed out corrupt officials, revitalise the laggard economy and improve the country’s negatively perceived business climate. Adding to his administration’s confidence, Aquino has three recent investment credit upgrades and growth of 6.6 per cent in 2012 to stand behind.

But in his voracious drive to snuff out former foes branded a corrupt villains, Aquino has been cross-checked for not concentrating hard enough on the country’s major blights: endemic poverty and a lack of jobs.

It can be said that today’s midterm election is more about personalities than platforms, with this year’s ballot featuring some astounding comebacks.

Former Philippine president and one-time Manila mayor, Joseph Estrada is now back on the ballot contending for the capital’s mayoral position once again.

Imelda Marcos has lured supporters back to her camp in Ilocos Norte to support her for a second term representing the northern Luzon province.

That Marcos was accused of laundering billions of dollars when her late husband ruled over the Philippines with an iron fist yet has never come to trial is stark evidence of just how far Aquino’s drive to rid corruption in the nation has left to go.

“Imelda Marcos has no actual power. She may win again but she is an outcast in Manila,” a member of the presidential team PNoy told Inside Investor.

During a trip to a polling station in Makati, Inside Investor observed that transparent measures were being taken to ensure free and fair elections.

Unlike recent elections in Malaysia, the dueling parties were not given unfair advertising space in the station, and the country’s electoral commission has been forthcoming with reporting incidences of power shortage and mechanical failures so far across the country.

Some photographic impressions from a polling station in Makati (© Oliver Ellerton):

IMG_3167

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3156

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3159

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3152

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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