Philippine VP calls for stronger cybersecurity

Reading Time: 1 minute

Jejomar-BinayPhilippine Vice President Jejomar Binay is calling for a “stronger national cybersecurity policy,” as cyber-attacks increasingly threaten the government, businesses, and individuals in the country.

The VP spoke at a SecureAsia@Manila Conference in Makati on August 7, where he urged the formation of a public-private partnership to develop solutions to this rising threat. In particular, VP Binay called for a policy that would allow Philippine authorities to “pursue perpetrators within our boundaries by having more proactive cybersecurity agreements with other countries.”

“The borders of the online world are porous and more elastic, but indeed there are undeniable boundaries that we must all recognize,” Binay said. “Let us work toward arriving at a common set of norms to ensure the rule of law in cyberspace.”

Binay singled out Iran, North Korea, and China in his speech as authoritarian nations that pursue cyberwarfare as a means of achieving policy goals. In doing so, Binay implied that these countries are the sources of the threats that the Philippines is currently most worried about.

Last year, the Philippine government enacted the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. This law was widely attacked as an infringement on Philippine rights of privacy and free expression as it allowed the government to punish online libel and gather citizens’ internet traffic data. But by focusing on external threats in his speech yesterday, Binay seemed to be signaling that the government now has much bigger fish to fry.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 1 minute

Philippine Vice President Jejomar Binay is calling for a “stronger national cybersecurity policy,” as cyber-attacks increasingly threaten the government, businesses, and individuals in the country.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Jejomar-BinayPhilippine Vice President Jejomar Binay is calling for a “stronger national cybersecurity policy,” as cyber-attacks increasingly threaten the government, businesses, and individuals in the country.

The VP spoke at a SecureAsia@Manila Conference in Makati on August 7, where he urged the formation of a public-private partnership to develop solutions to this rising threat. In particular, VP Binay called for a policy that would allow Philippine authorities to “pursue perpetrators within our boundaries by having more proactive cybersecurity agreements with other countries.”

“The borders of the online world are porous and more elastic, but indeed there are undeniable boundaries that we must all recognize,” Binay said. “Let us work toward arriving at a common set of norms to ensure the rule of law in cyberspace.”

Binay singled out Iran, North Korea, and China in his speech as authoritarian nations that pursue cyberwarfare as a means of achieving policy goals. In doing so, Binay implied that these countries are the sources of the threats that the Philippines is currently most worried about.

Last year, the Philippine government enacted the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. This law was widely attacked as an infringement on Philippine rights of privacy and free expression as it allowed the government to punish online libel and gather citizens’ internet traffic data. But by focusing on external threats in his speech yesterday, Binay seemed to be signaling that the government now has much bigger fish to fry.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid