Philippines awards pioneer solar farm

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Solar farmThe Philippine government has green lighted the country’s first major solar farm to Philippine Solar Farm-Leyte, which can begin construction on a 30-megawatt plant in Ormoc City, Leyte.

“Philippine Solar Leyte-Farm will enter the project with a South Korean partner,” Director of the Renewable Energy Management Bureau Mario Marasigan told Inside Investor on June 18.

“They can start anytime and they should be in commercial operation by January 2015,” he added.

The project is to cost about $67 million and occupy a 44-hectare area.

In the Philippines, instead of issuing licenses, the Department of Energy (DOE) awards certificates of commerciality to companies looking to develop renewable energy projects.

Under the policy, foreign companies, such as the South Korean investors in the Leyte solar project, are awarded through a “contract system, which is a form of a public-private partnership, whereby the government owns the resources; i.e., the water resources, the wind resources,” Marasigan explained to Inside Investor.

The DOE is promoting the development of renewable energy through a feed-in tariff incentive, which will avail Philippine Solar Farm of P9.68 ($0.22) per kilowatt-hour.

Besides Leyte, a second solar project is likely to be granted a certificate for construction in Luzon, but details could not be released at the time of interview. The Luzon project will also be a 30-megawatt solar farm.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

The Philippine government has green lighted the country’s first major solar farm to Philippine Solar Farm-Leyte, which can begin construction on a 30-megawatt plant in Ormoc City, Leyte.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Solar farmThe Philippine government has green lighted the country’s first major solar farm to Philippine Solar Farm-Leyte, which can begin construction on a 30-megawatt plant in Ormoc City, Leyte.

“Philippine Solar Leyte-Farm will enter the project with a South Korean partner,” Director of the Renewable Energy Management Bureau Mario Marasigan told Inside Investor on June 18.

“They can start anytime and they should be in commercial operation by January 2015,” he added.

The project is to cost about $67 million and occupy a 44-hectare area.

In the Philippines, instead of issuing licenses, the Department of Energy (DOE) awards certificates of commerciality to companies looking to develop renewable energy projects.

Under the policy, foreign companies, such as the South Korean investors in the Leyte solar project, are awarded through a “contract system, which is a form of a public-private partnership, whereby the government owns the resources; i.e., the water resources, the wind resources,” Marasigan explained to Inside Investor.

The DOE is promoting the development of renewable energy through a feed-in tariff incentive, which will avail Philippine Solar Farm of P9.68 ($0.22) per kilowatt-hour.

Besides Leyte, a second solar project is likely to be granted a certificate for construction in Luzon, but details could not be released at the time of interview. The Luzon project will also be a 30-megawatt solar farm.

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