Philippines recognises the value of exporting labour

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Western UnionWith remittances to the Philippines by overseas workers reaching $7.7 billion during the first four months of 2013, local officials have begun to stand by the importance exported labour plays in the Southeast Asian country despite the negative stigma it retains elsewhere.

That demand for highly skilled Filipinos has become conspicuous makes the position more attractive. Of the 367,738 job orders received by the Philippines from January to March, about 30 per cent were for relatively high-paying positions, data released by the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration has revealed.

“The job orders are mainly intended for employment opportunities in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Taiwan, Kuwait, Qatar, and Hong Kong,” the report said.

Moreover, the Philippines has – if not admittedly – formed a dependence on money sent home to buoy the torpid economy, accounting for roughly 10 per cent of total nominal GDP in 2012. With the new figures in for the top of 2013, remittances are showing strong signs that they are staying, rising 6.4 per cent from the same period last year.

But while the idea that growing numbers of Filipinos must leave their country to find gainful employment may hurt the legitimacy of a government that is pounding on policies driving toward economic inclusiveness, the formation of the ASEAN Economic Community expected in 2015 brings another dimension to the perception of exporting talent.

“I don’t have any problem with export labour. In the business world that’s the way it should go; it’s an open, global economy,” Secretary General Crisanto Frianeza of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) told Inside Investor.

“With the formation of the AEC in 2015 the free flow of people will point our countrymen to where there is need for other skilled workers in the region,” he added.

According to Frianeza, the Philippine’s comparative advantage in human resources will complement economies in ASEAN, presenting opportunities that the PCCI is working towards by working with other business organisations to streamline technical vocational training.

Besides human resource positions, Frianeza also pointed to talents in the software development industry, as well as the potential for the Philippines to become an ASEAN hub for the production of electric vehicles, now that a boost has been given by the Asian Development Bank.

“You cant’ force workers to stay,” Frianeza concludes.

With the advent of an integrated regional order on its way, the acceptance of labour mobility seems a safe position to hold.

 

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

With remittances to the Philippines by overseas workers reaching $7.7 billion during the first four months of 2013, local officials have begun to stand by the importance exported labour plays in the Southeast Asian country despite the negative stigma it retains elsewhere.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Western UnionWith remittances to the Philippines by overseas workers reaching $7.7 billion during the first four months of 2013, local officials have begun to stand by the importance exported labour plays in the Southeast Asian country despite the negative stigma it retains elsewhere.

That demand for highly skilled Filipinos has become conspicuous makes the position more attractive. Of the 367,738 job orders received by the Philippines from January to March, about 30 per cent were for relatively high-paying positions, data released by the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration has revealed.

“The job orders are mainly intended for employment opportunities in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Taiwan, Kuwait, Qatar, and Hong Kong,” the report said.

Moreover, the Philippines has – if not admittedly – formed a dependence on money sent home to buoy the torpid economy, accounting for roughly 10 per cent of total nominal GDP in 2012. With the new figures in for the top of 2013, remittances are showing strong signs that they are staying, rising 6.4 per cent from the same period last year.

But while the idea that growing numbers of Filipinos must leave their country to find gainful employment may hurt the legitimacy of a government that is pounding on policies driving toward economic inclusiveness, the formation of the ASEAN Economic Community expected in 2015 brings another dimension to the perception of exporting talent.

“I don’t have any problem with export labour. In the business world that’s the way it should go; it’s an open, global economy,” Secretary General Crisanto Frianeza of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) told Inside Investor.

“With the formation of the AEC in 2015 the free flow of people will point our countrymen to where there is need for other skilled workers in the region,” he added.

According to Frianeza, the Philippine’s comparative advantage in human resources will complement economies in ASEAN, presenting opportunities that the PCCI is working towards by working with other business organisations to streamline technical vocational training.

Besides human resource positions, Frianeza also pointed to talents in the software development industry, as well as the potential for the Philippines to become an ASEAN hub for the production of electric vehicles, now that a boost has been given by the Asian Development Bank.

“You cant’ force workers to stay,” Frianeza concludes.

With the advent of an integrated regional order on its way, the acceptance of labour mobility seems a safe position to hold.

 

 

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