Phnom Penh introduces public buses

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Phnom Penh public transport
Masterplan for Phnom Penh’s public transport, including a tramway line

Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh, which has no public mass transport system, has introduced a long-awaited bus service that now runs on a one-month trial under surveillance of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the initiator of the project.

The daily service, which costs passengers 1,500 riel (about $0. 37) for a single trip, will run from 5:30am to 8:30pm from the Old Stadium roundabout in the north to Chbar Ampov terminal in the south, stopping 36 times along the 7-kilometer route, according to an announcement. Each bus can accommodate 35 passengers.

The new transport system is aimed at easing traffic jams and “improve public order,” Phnom Penh Governor Pa Socheatvong said.

The last time Phnom Penh had public buses was for a brief period in 2001, but the service was canceled after two months due to lack of interest from the motorbike-riding public.

Local means of public transportation within the city include cycle rickshaws, motorcycle taxis, auto rickshaws with or without trailers and standard taxicabs. The city of roughly 1.5 million people has about 1.5 million motorbikes and over 30,000 cars clogging the roads.

An update of the JICA urban transport master plan for Phnom Penh is due for completion in 2014, but may not be completely implemented until 2035, JICA officials said.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Masterplan for Phnom Penh’s public transport, including a tramway line

Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh, which has no public mass transport system, has introduced a long-awaited bus service that now runs on a one-month trial under surveillance of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the initiator of the project.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Phnom Penh public transport
Masterplan for Phnom Penh’s public transport, including a tramway line

Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh, which has no public mass transport system, has introduced a long-awaited bus service that now runs on a one-month trial under surveillance of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the initiator of the project.

The daily service, which costs passengers 1,500 riel (about $0. 37) for a single trip, will run from 5:30am to 8:30pm from the Old Stadium roundabout in the north to Chbar Ampov terminal in the south, stopping 36 times along the 7-kilometer route, according to an announcement. Each bus can accommodate 35 passengers.

The new transport system is aimed at easing traffic jams and “improve public order,” Phnom Penh Governor Pa Socheatvong said.

The last time Phnom Penh had public buses was for a brief period in 2001, but the service was canceled after two months due to lack of interest from the motorbike-riding public.

Local means of public transportation within the city include cycle rickshaws, motorcycle taxis, auto rickshaws with or without trailers and standard taxicabs. The city of roughly 1.5 million people has about 1.5 million motorbikes and over 30,000 cars clogging the roads.

An update of the JICA urban transport master plan for Phnom Penh is due for completion in 2014, but may not be completely implemented until 2035, JICA officials said.

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