Going green – Interview

Reading Time: 3 minutes
Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings
Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings

PJI Holdings is a group of companies specialising in electrical and mechanical engineering services, renewable energy, power and water engineering services. The company is also interested in working with investors in green energy technology and related fields. Insider Investor caught up with Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings, to learn more about the company’s aspirations.

Q: Can you tell us who stand behind PJI Holdings and who are the major shareholders?

A: At the moment, the company has no major shareholders. However, the company is being managed by myself together with Mr Geh Yean Chang, the other executive director.

Q: Can you outline the company’s structure?

A: We have seven subsidiaries and two associate companies. So far only one is operating overseas, a joint-venture for a water treatment plant in China.

Q: How big is your property development business?

A: We are primarily an engineering company, but as of 2010, we have adopted some elements of property development as we want to venture into that segment.

Q: What are your current flagship projects?

A: We are currently a contractor for the electrical and fire protection services for the KLIA 2 terminal and its satellite building in Sepang. The contract value is close to RM80 million. We are also doing the full mechanical and electrical works for a project in the northern state of Kedah, a contract worth RM 55 million. These are the two major flagships as of now. Other than that, we have projects in Sabah and Penang.

Q: Who are your main clients?

A: Mostly government-linked companies, and also some main builders such as Bina Puri or IJM for which we work as their mechanical and electrical contractors.

Q: You have been working on the Formula 1 racing track in Sepang?

A: Yes, this was one of the major engineering contracts for this company. We did the electrical installation there. The challenge was mainly the tight timeframe for completion, it was quite a short period. The other challenge was that the area was very big and that, of course, it was a project of national significance.

Q: Are you actively looking for investors or investment partnerships?

A: We are open to investors, mainly in the property development sector, or in the fields of power plants, biomass, solar farms, and renewable energy. It should be somebody keen to invest in Malaysia or in neighboring countries such as Thailand or Indonesia. These are two big and important economies in Southeast Asia we are looking at. For the investor, we could be their contractor. If there is an interested party, we can always talk about it.

Q: Do you have partners from the GCC? What is your international strategy?

A: No. We have been in Abu Dhabi and Doha and have tendered many jobs, but haven’t been successful. We might look for new jobs there, but not in the short term. We will be expanding more regionally in the near future, with a focus on China and also on Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar, which is a new hot spot coming up. We also have an office in Singapore, but are currently not active there. We have been eyeing Vietnam, but decided to stay out of this market for the time being.

Q: What are your future plans in the green energy sector?

A: We are actually looking for partners, whoever is interested in that sector. Or we might develop a project here in Malaysia and apply for a concession, and approach an investor who wants to join us. The other thing is that we want to develop a biomass power plant from palm oil waste together with an investor. We have already been involved in biomass projects before and have the expertise.

Q: How would you assess the market for developers and contract engineering firms in Malaysia in general?

A: Contracts are awarded only on tendering basis, regardless if they come from the government or from private companies, which means competition is tight. However, the entry level for new players is not very high, but the market is nearing saturation, so success depends on the size a company is. We are lucky to be one of the bigger companies, among the top five in the sector.

Q: The past five years have been quite challenging for PJI Holdings in financial terms. What is your outlook?

A: Yes, it has been challenging. We were deep down, but not under the water. After a change in shareholders, it is going forward now. We should go quite comfortably through 2012. It will not be a fantastic year, but we will make good progress. We are looking beyond 2013, this will be our turnaround date.

 

 

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Reading Time: 3 minutes

Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings

PJI Holdings is a group of companies specialising in electrical and mechanical engineering services, renewable energy, power and water engineering services. The company is also interested in working with investors in green energy technology and related fields. Insider Investor caught up with Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings, to learn more about the company’s aspirations.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings
Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings

PJI Holdings is a group of companies specialising in electrical and mechanical engineering services, renewable energy, power and water engineering services. The company is also interested in working with investors in green energy technology and related fields. Insider Investor caught up with Lim Chong Ling, Managing Director of PJI Holdings, to learn more about the company’s aspirations.

Q: Can you tell us who stand behind PJI Holdings and who are the major shareholders?

A: At the moment, the company has no major shareholders. However, the company is being managed by myself together with Mr Geh Yean Chang, the other executive director.

Q: Can you outline the company’s structure?

A: We have seven subsidiaries and two associate companies. So far only one is operating overseas, a joint-venture for a water treatment plant in China.

Q: How big is your property development business?

A: We are primarily an engineering company, but as of 2010, we have adopted some elements of property development as we want to venture into that segment.

Q: What are your current flagship projects?

A: We are currently a contractor for the electrical and fire protection services for the KLIA 2 terminal and its satellite building in Sepang. The contract value is close to RM80 million. We are also doing the full mechanical and electrical works for a project in the northern state of Kedah, a contract worth RM 55 million. These are the two major flagships as of now. Other than that, we have projects in Sabah and Penang.

Q: Who are your main clients?

A: Mostly government-linked companies, and also some main builders such as Bina Puri or IJM for which we work as their mechanical and electrical contractors.

Q: You have been working on the Formula 1 racing track in Sepang?

A: Yes, this was one of the major engineering contracts for this company. We did the electrical installation there. The challenge was mainly the tight timeframe for completion, it was quite a short period. The other challenge was that the area was very big and that, of course, it was a project of national significance.

Q: Are you actively looking for investors or investment partnerships?

A: We are open to investors, mainly in the property development sector, or in the fields of power plants, biomass, solar farms, and renewable energy. It should be somebody keen to invest in Malaysia or in neighboring countries such as Thailand or Indonesia. These are two big and important economies in Southeast Asia we are looking at. For the investor, we could be their contractor. If there is an interested party, we can always talk about it.

Q: Do you have partners from the GCC? What is your international strategy?

A: No. We have been in Abu Dhabi and Doha and have tendered many jobs, but haven’t been successful. We might look for new jobs there, but not in the short term. We will be expanding more regionally in the near future, with a focus on China and also on Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar, which is a new hot spot coming up. We also have an office in Singapore, but are currently not active there. We have been eyeing Vietnam, but decided to stay out of this market for the time being.

Q: What are your future plans in the green energy sector?

A: We are actually looking for partners, whoever is interested in that sector. Or we might develop a project here in Malaysia and apply for a concession, and approach an investor who wants to join us. The other thing is that we want to develop a biomass power plant from palm oil waste together with an investor. We have already been involved in biomass projects before and have the expertise.

Q: How would you assess the market for developers and contract engineering firms in Malaysia in general?

A: Contracts are awarded only on tendering basis, regardless if they come from the government or from private companies, which means competition is tight. However, the entry level for new players is not very high, but the market is nearing saturation, so success depends on the size a company is. We are lucky to be one of the bigger companies, among the top five in the sector.

Q: The past five years have been quite challenging for PJI Holdings in financial terms. What is your outlook?

A: Yes, it has been challenging. We were deep down, but not under the water. After a change in shareholders, it is going forward now. We should go quite comfortably through 2012. It will not be a fantastic year, but we will make good progress. We are looking beyond 2013, this will be our turnaround date.

 

 

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