Police: ‘Organised crime can turn Malaysia into Mexico’

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Malaysia polisIf there is no release of preventive laws to curb organised crime, Malaysia is on its way to turn into a Mexico or Colombia, Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar said at a forum on crime prevention and public safety at the Home Ministry in Kuala Lumpur on September 28, referring to drug gangs and hitmen terrorising these two countries.

“In Mexico and Colombia, organised crime, such as drug cartels, became powerful because there are weak enforcement institutions. When it is weak, these cartels and mafia will rule the country,” Bakar said.

“Would we want our country to be like that? Of course not. We want strict and strong preventive laws in order for us to carry out our duty in combating crime,” he added.

The proposed amendments to the Prevention Crime Act 1953 (PCA) were presented to the Malaysian parliament on September 25, giving the authorities the power to detain hardcore criminals for up to two years without trial.

Khalid said the PCA is vital although Malaysia has “the best” judicial system where the criminals could be tried and defend themselves.However, he said, it still does not guarantee that the criminal would be put behind bars due to lack of credible witnesses to testify against them.

“In the case of triads and other organised crime, no witnesses would want to come to the open court and testify for fear of their lives,” he said.

Khalid said that the triads and secret societies that were recently exposed were now becoming bolder in showing off their activities to the public due to the abolishment of Internal Security Act (ISA) and Emergency Ordinance (EO) in 2011.

“After these laws were repealed, they are getting braver with their activities even in broad daylight and the crime rate is increasing significantly. Therefore, I hope the people understand why we need these preventive laws so that we can ensure that we all leave in peace and harmony,” Bakar said.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

If there is no release of preventive laws to curb organised crime, Malaysia is on its way to turn into a Mexico or Colombia, Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar said at a forum on crime prevention and public safety at the Home Ministry in Kuala Lumpur on September 28, referring to drug gangs and hitmen terrorising these two countries.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Malaysia polisIf there is no release of preventive laws to curb organised crime, Malaysia is on its way to turn into a Mexico or Colombia, Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar said at a forum on crime prevention and public safety at the Home Ministry in Kuala Lumpur on September 28, referring to drug gangs and hitmen terrorising these two countries.

“In Mexico and Colombia, organised crime, such as drug cartels, became powerful because there are weak enforcement institutions. When it is weak, these cartels and mafia will rule the country,” Bakar said.

“Would we want our country to be like that? Of course not. We want strict and strong preventive laws in order for us to carry out our duty in combating crime,” he added.

The proposed amendments to the Prevention Crime Act 1953 (PCA) were presented to the Malaysian parliament on September 25, giving the authorities the power to detain hardcore criminals for up to two years without trial.

Khalid said the PCA is vital although Malaysia has “the best” judicial system where the criminals could be tried and defend themselves.However, he said, it still does not guarantee that the criminal would be put behind bars due to lack of credible witnesses to testify against them.

“In the case of triads and other organised crime, no witnesses would want to come to the open court and testify for fear of their lives,” he said.

Khalid said that the triads and secret societies that were recently exposed were now becoming bolder in showing off their activities to the public due to the abolishment of Internal Security Act (ISA) and Emergency Ordinance (EO) in 2011.

“After these laws were repealed, they are getting braver with their activities even in broad daylight and the crime rate is increasing significantly. Therefore, I hope the people understand why we need these preventive laws so that we can ensure that we all leave in peace and harmony,” Bakar said.

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