Protesters address PPPs in Manila

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The public healthcare system in the Philippines is ridden with inefficiencies

An estimated 1,000 government healthcare workers staged a walkout on October 25 in Manila in protest of cost-raising privatisation measures to be instated under new private-public partnerships (PPP) supported by the Aquino government and Asian Development Bank, the Philippine Inquirer reported.

The public healthcare system in the Philippines is ridden with inefficiencies, government healthcare officials have stressed, and necessitate the participation of the private sector. However, healthcare workers worry that privatisation of the system could deprive poorer patients of service due to higher costs.

The walkout took place just days after the launch of the “PPP in Health Manila 2012” event, a gathering held under the auspices of the Asian Development Bank that brought together academics, CEOs and other leaders in the healthcare sector.

Health Secretary Enrique Ona, reading a speech for President Aquino, said to the audience that the “PPP in Health” event was in line with the “current thrust of the Aquino government, which recognises the essential role of the private sector.”

Currently, the public healthcare sector has failed to provide adequate healthcare for every Filipino, Ona said, and that only the private sector can provide the knowledge and business models to develop the cumbersome system.

“Regardless of how much government would give [as share of the budget] to the health sector,” Ona noted, “there will never be enough funds for healthcare [for everyone].”

Addressing the bugbear of spiked healthcare costs, Ona said that the success of the PPP model can be found through the implementation of “a robust and vibrant health insurance system,” expressing optimism that “soon all [Filipinos] will be covered by PhilHealth,” placing even the most complicated procedures within financial reach of ordinary Filipinos.

Elsewhere, the concept of the PPP was being built upon in Bacolod in the central Philippines, where the city was selected by the Partnership for Democratic Local Governance in Southeast Asia (DELGOSEA), a project-basis organisation comprised of a network of local government associations, NGOs and local authorities in the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia.

In the memorandum of understanding signed with DELGOSEA, Bacolod will work upon the success seen in Toul Sangke, Cambodia to implement the best practices of PPPs through a people-private-public partnership (PPPP).

This innovative concept is seen as the most inclusive form of the popular PPP model because of its level of people participation and support of stakeholders in social development, which results in increased confidence from the community.

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The public healthcare system in the Philippines is ridden with inefficiencies

An estimated 1,000 government healthcare workers staged a walkout on October 25 in Manila in protest of cost-raising privatisation measures to be instated under new private-public partnerships (PPP) supported by the Aquino government and Asian Development Bank, the Philippine Inquirer reported.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The public healthcare system in the Philippines is ridden with inefficiencies

An estimated 1,000 government healthcare workers staged a walkout on October 25 in Manila in protest of cost-raising privatisation measures to be instated under new private-public partnerships (PPP) supported by the Aquino government and Asian Development Bank, the Philippine Inquirer reported.

The public healthcare system in the Philippines is ridden with inefficiencies, government healthcare officials have stressed, and necessitate the participation of the private sector. However, healthcare workers worry that privatisation of the system could deprive poorer patients of service due to higher costs.

The walkout took place just days after the launch of the “PPP in Health Manila 2012” event, a gathering held under the auspices of the Asian Development Bank that brought together academics, CEOs and other leaders in the healthcare sector.

Health Secretary Enrique Ona, reading a speech for President Aquino, said to the audience that the “PPP in Health” event was in line with the “current thrust of the Aquino government, which recognises the essential role of the private sector.”

Currently, the public healthcare sector has failed to provide adequate healthcare for every Filipino, Ona said, and that only the private sector can provide the knowledge and business models to develop the cumbersome system.

“Regardless of how much government would give [as share of the budget] to the health sector,” Ona noted, “there will never be enough funds for healthcare [for everyone].”

Addressing the bugbear of spiked healthcare costs, Ona said that the success of the PPP model can be found through the implementation of “a robust and vibrant health insurance system,” expressing optimism that “soon all [Filipinos] will be covered by PhilHealth,” placing even the most complicated procedures within financial reach of ordinary Filipinos.

Elsewhere, the concept of the PPP was being built upon in Bacolod in the central Philippines, where the city was selected by the Partnership for Democratic Local Governance in Southeast Asia (DELGOSEA), a project-basis organisation comprised of a network of local government associations, NGOs and local authorities in the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia.

In the memorandum of understanding signed with DELGOSEA, Bacolod will work upon the success seen in Toul Sangke, Cambodia to implement the best practices of PPPs through a people-private-public partnership (PPPP).

This innovative concept is seen as the most inclusive form of the popular PPP model because of its level of people participation and support of stakeholders in social development, which results in increased confidence from the community.

 

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