Riots and ATM queues after Cambodia elections

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PP riots1After the Cambodian opposition rejected the election result of July 28 that saw the ruling Cambodian People’s Party win a small majority, riots broke out in the capital Phnom Penh and people queued in front of ATMs to withdraw cash over concerns that banks might shut down.

The riots began on election day, culminating after a day-long demonstration against voting irregularities, the Cambodian Daily reported. The protest was staged by voters who failed to find their names on voting lists during the election. The protest turned violent after an alleged attack at one of the disgruntled voters, a Buddhist monk, by police.

More than 100 military police officers arrived and were pelted with rocks by the angry mob, which also smashed windows and overturned and set fire to police cars. Riot police armed with water cannons were deployed to the area, but did not clash with the protesters who eventually dispersed.

Opposition leader Sam Rainsy told a news conference that “there were 1.2 to 1.3 million people whose names were missing and could not vote. They deleted our rights to vote, how could we recognise this election?”

Meanwhile, long lines were forming at ATMs in Phnom Penh amid concerns over the election and the following unrest. Acleda Bank, one of the largest banks in Cambodia, said that it is prepared to refill the machines with cash and has asked the National Bank of Cambodia, Association of Banks of Cambodia, as well as foreign lenders for financial support.

However, Acleda’s executive vice president Chhay Soeun said according to the Phnom Penh Post there was “no guarantee that Acleda customers will have access to all of their funds” if the unrest continues.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

After the Cambodian opposition rejected the election result of July 28 that saw the ruling Cambodian People’s Party win a small majority, riots broke out in the capital Phnom Penh and people queued in front of ATMs to withdraw cash over concerns that banks might shut down.

Reading Time: 1 minute

PP riots1After the Cambodian opposition rejected the election result of July 28 that saw the ruling Cambodian People’s Party win a small majority, riots broke out in the capital Phnom Penh and people queued in front of ATMs to withdraw cash over concerns that banks might shut down.

The riots began on election day, culminating after a day-long demonstration against voting irregularities, the Cambodian Daily reported. The protest was staged by voters who failed to find their names on voting lists during the election. The protest turned violent after an alleged attack at one of the disgruntled voters, a Buddhist monk, by police.

More than 100 military police officers arrived and were pelted with rocks by the angry mob, which also smashed windows and overturned and set fire to police cars. Riot police armed with water cannons were deployed to the area, but did not clash with the protesters who eventually dispersed.

Opposition leader Sam Rainsy told a news conference that “there were 1.2 to 1.3 million people whose names were missing and could not vote. They deleted our rights to vote, how could we recognise this election?”

Meanwhile, long lines were forming at ATMs in Phnom Penh amid concerns over the election and the following unrest. Acleda Bank, one of the largest banks in Cambodia, said that it is prepared to refill the machines with cash and has asked the National Bank of Cambodia, Association of Banks of Cambodia, as well as foreign lenders for financial support.

However, Acleda’s executive vice president Chhay Soeun said according to the Phnom Penh Post there was “no guarantee that Acleda customers will have access to all of their funds” if the unrest continues.

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