Rules tightened for Singapore expats

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Times are changing for expats in Singapore as regulations for foreign workers are becoming tougher

Conditions for foreign workers in Singapore are becoming tougher as the city state’s Ministry of Manpower is tightening the screw on expats, UK newspaper The Daily Telegraph reported.

According to the report, Singapore will from September 2012 onwards only allow expatriates to bring in their spouses and children to stay with them if the sponsor earns at least 4,000 Singapore dollars ($3,175) a month.

Some workers will also no longer be able to bring their parents and in-laws on long-term visit passes, the paper said.

Marriages between Singaporeans and expatriates for the sole purpose of obtaining immigration privileges will be criminalised in the future, the ministry also said.

The measures follow similar steps introduced last year when Singapore launched an extra 10 per cent stamp duty charge for any foreigner wanting to buy property on the island. It has also raised fees for foreigners wanting to send their children to local schools.

Since July 2012, manufacturing companies in Singapore are forced to reduce the ratio of foreign employees among their staff to 60 per cent from 65 per cent. Furthermore, the so-called Financial Investor Scheme through which high-net worth foreigners currently can park at least 10 million Singapore dollars ($7.9 million) in Singapore for five years to gain permanent resident status is to get scrapped as well.

The ministry said it is implementing these measures to ease pressure on social infrastructure. One fifth of Singapore’s population are foreigners working in the city with an income above average, causing locals to worry about rising public transport and property prices and a widening gap between rich and poor residents.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Times are changing for expats in Singapore as regulations for foreign workers are becoming tougher

Conditions for foreign workers in Singapore are becoming tougher as the city state’s Ministry of Manpower is tightening the screw on expats, UK newspaper The Daily Telegraph reported.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Times are changing for expats in Singapore as regulations for foreign workers are becoming tougher

Conditions for foreign workers in Singapore are becoming tougher as the city state’s Ministry of Manpower is tightening the screw on expats, UK newspaper The Daily Telegraph reported.

According to the report, Singapore will from September 2012 onwards only allow expatriates to bring in their spouses and children to stay with them if the sponsor earns at least 4,000 Singapore dollars ($3,175) a month.

Some workers will also no longer be able to bring their parents and in-laws on long-term visit passes, the paper said.

Marriages between Singaporeans and expatriates for the sole purpose of obtaining immigration privileges will be criminalised in the future, the ministry also said.

The measures follow similar steps introduced last year when Singapore launched an extra 10 per cent stamp duty charge for any foreigner wanting to buy property on the island. It has also raised fees for foreigners wanting to send their children to local schools.

Since July 2012, manufacturing companies in Singapore are forced to reduce the ratio of foreign employees among their staff to 60 per cent from 65 per cent. Furthermore, the so-called Financial Investor Scheme through which high-net worth foreigners currently can park at least 10 million Singapore dollars ($7.9 million) in Singapore for five years to gain permanent resident status is to get scrapped as well.

The ministry said it is implementing these measures to ease pressure on social infrastructure. One fifth of Singapore’s population are foreigners working in the city with an income above average, causing locals to worry about rising public transport and property prices and a widening gap between rich and poor residents.

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