Russia beefs up anti-spy measures – and buys typewriters

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Triumph Adler
Triumph Adlew TWEN 180 electric typewriter

In the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal brought to light by whistleblower Edward Snowden, Russia has decided to take radical measures to avoid Internet snooping – and returns to foolproof old-fashioned typewriters.

Russia’s Federal Guard Agency has ordered 20 electric typewriters Triumph Adlew TWEN 180, Izvestiya newspaper reported on July 12. It will spend around $15,000 for the devices, including ribbons.

The defense and emergencies ministries and the “special services” in the country are now creating documents on non-electronic devices which are now “recommended for confidential documents.” The practice of creating paper documents will be expanded in the future, the report said.

“From the point of view of keeping secrets, the most primitive method is preferred: A human hand with a pen or a typewriter,” Nikolai Kovalev, a lawmaker and former head of the Russian Federal Security Service, was quoted as saying.

Typerwriters were broadly used until the end of the 1980s, but then word processors and personal computers largely displaced them in the Western world. However, the classic typewriter is still prominent in developing countries and regions such as India, Latin America and Africa because they can be used without electrical power.

In 2011, it was reported that the world’s last typewriter manufacturer, Godrej and Boyce, shut down its production plant in Mumbai, India. However, there seem to be still manufacturers in Indonesia, Japan and China making typewriters. In fact, Japanese producer Nakajima operates a typewriter factory in Jakarta, Indonesia.

 

 

 

 

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Triumph Adlew TWEN 180 electric typewriter

In the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal brought to light by whistleblower Edward Snowden, Russia has decided to take radical measures to avoid Internet snooping – and returns to foolproof old-fashioned typewriters.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Triumph Adler
Triumph Adlew TWEN 180 electric typewriter

In the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal brought to light by whistleblower Edward Snowden, Russia has decided to take radical measures to avoid Internet snooping – and returns to foolproof old-fashioned typewriters.

Russia’s Federal Guard Agency has ordered 20 electric typewriters Triumph Adlew TWEN 180, Izvestiya newspaper reported on July 12. It will spend around $15,000 for the devices, including ribbons.

The defense and emergencies ministries and the “special services” in the country are now creating documents on non-electronic devices which are now “recommended for confidential documents.” The practice of creating paper documents will be expanded in the future, the report said.

“From the point of view of keeping secrets, the most primitive method is preferred: A human hand with a pen or a typewriter,” Nikolai Kovalev, a lawmaker and former head of the Russian Federal Security Service, was quoted as saying.

Typerwriters were broadly used until the end of the 1980s, but then word processors and personal computers largely displaced them in the Western world. However, the classic typewriter is still prominent in developing countries and regions such as India, Latin America and Africa because they can be used without electrical power.

In 2011, it was reported that the world’s last typewriter manufacturer, Godrej and Boyce, shut down its production plant in Mumbai, India. However, there seem to be still manufacturers in Indonesia, Japan and China making typewriters. In fact, Japanese producer Nakajima operates a typewriter factory in Jakarta, Indonesia.

 

 

 

 

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