San Francisco’s tech revolution – a photoblog

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sir-moritz
Sir Michael Moritz, Chairman of Sequoia Capital

What made San Francisco stand out in its economic development, producing high-caliber tech companies, top-notch IT experts and laying the foundations for the global hub of creative computer start-ups in nearby Silicon Valley that produced global leaders such as Google, Facebook, Amazon and many others?

By Kamran Saddique

At the September 9 TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco 2013, a well-visited technology conference held annually, Sir Michael Moritz of venture capital firm Sequoia Capital reflected on the city’s journey from the very beginnings.

Lets look at what has happened between San Francisco to San Jose in the past 150 years:

Image1
Life as it was in California, centered around farming
Image2
The first phase of the Industrial Revolution and centralisation of tools
Image3
The move to an organised workforce from a farm to a factory
Image4
Factories were isolated from the consumers; feedback from consumers to the factory was lengthy
Image5
Deployment of computers from 1986 onwards
Image6
Explosion of data storage
Image7
Bandwidth reaches new heights
Image8
Apps growing extremely popular
Image9
What has happened to the cost and dispersion of the tools in the past few decades? The power of a Samsung S4 is the same as a $33 million computer in 1973
Image10
Peak production numbers globally
Image11
Small businesses get tools at a limited price to do business
Image12
Sales, promoting and hiring becomes much easier
Image13
Data factories: The matching of labour
Image14
The movement and raising of money goes online
Image15
Real global data companies emerge
Image16
Compared to the industrial revolution, data factories need far fewer employees, are far more connected directly to consumers who provide and enrich feedback immediately. Data factories are even now paying consumers who enrich them
Image18
LinkedIn unpaid content contributors and traffic has multiplied 8 times due to unpaid contributions
Image19
Life gets tough as you need to be highly competent and aggressive to get a job now
Image20
Tech has not had a big effect on GDP in the US, and some of the reasons include H1B Visas
Image21
A H1B visa is a non-immigrant visa that allows US companies to employ foreign workers in specialty occupations that require theoretical or technical skills
Image22
The shift in the technology revolution that has occurred simultaneously around the world. We have looked at US companies in these slideshows but this is happening simultaneously in Asia More then half of the top Fortune companies are now not from the US.

 

 

 

 

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Sir Michael Moritz, Chairman of Sequoia Capital

What made San Francisco stand out in its economic development, producing high-caliber tech companies, top-notch IT experts and laying the foundations for the global hub of creative computer start-ups in nearby Silicon Valley that produced global leaders such as Google, Facebook, Amazon and many others?

Reading Time: 1 minute

sir-moritz
Sir Michael Moritz, Chairman of Sequoia Capital

What made San Francisco stand out in its economic development, producing high-caliber tech companies, top-notch IT experts and laying the foundations for the global hub of creative computer start-ups in nearby Silicon Valley that produced global leaders such as Google, Facebook, Amazon and many others?

By Kamran Saddique

At the September 9 TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco 2013, a well-visited technology conference held annually, Sir Michael Moritz of venture capital firm Sequoia Capital reflected on the city’s journey from the very beginnings.

Lets look at what has happened between San Francisco to San Jose in the past 150 years:

Image1
Life as it was in California, centered around farming
Image2
The first phase of the Industrial Revolution and centralisation of tools
Image3
The move to an organised workforce from a farm to a factory
Image4
Factories were isolated from the consumers; feedback from consumers to the factory was lengthy
Image5
Deployment of computers from 1986 onwards
Image6
Explosion of data storage
Image7
Bandwidth reaches new heights
Image8
Apps growing extremely popular
Image9
What has happened to the cost and dispersion of the tools in the past few decades? The power of a Samsung S4 is the same as a $33 million computer in 1973
Image10
Peak production numbers globally
Image11
Small businesses get tools at a limited price to do business
Image12
Sales, promoting and hiring becomes much easier
Image13
Data factories: The matching of labour
Image14
The movement and raising of money goes online
Image15
Real global data companies emerge
Image16
Compared to the industrial revolution, data factories need far fewer employees, are far more connected directly to consumers who provide and enrich feedback immediately. Data factories are even now paying consumers who enrich them
Image18
LinkedIn unpaid content contributors and traffic has multiplied 8 times due to unpaid contributions
Image19
Life gets tough as you need to be highly competent and aggressive to get a job now
Image20
Tech has not had a big effect on GDP in the US, and some of the reasons include H1B Visas
Image21
A H1B visa is a non-immigrant visa that allows US companies to employ foreign workers in specialty occupations that require theoretical or technical skills
Image22
The shift in the technology revolution that has occurred simultaneously around the world. We have looked at US companies in these slideshows but this is happening simultaneously in Asia More then half of the top Fortune companies are now not from the US.

 

 

 

 

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