Sarawak Hidro determined to fulfil its energy promises

The Bakun Dam in Sarawak is the centre point for the state’s power demands as it feeds heavy industries that need massive amounts of energy to survive. The company behind the dam, Sarawak Hidro, is confident the giant structure can fulfil its commitments.

Sarawak Hidro has taken on a massive burden to go with its massive dam – and the company is determined to fulfil its promises to the people and provide a reliable source of continuous energy while enhancing quality of life.

Tan Sri Izzudin Bin Dali, Chairman of Sarawak Hidro, said the huge Bakun Dam project will generate 2,400 megawatts of power, offering the region a fresh lifeline in terms of power and energy requirements.

“We want to ensure we meet all those targets that we have agreed,” said Tan Sri Izzudin. “Our objective over the next two years is to achieve all that we have promised and not have any technical problems.”

Sarawak Hidro’s commitments are to the people and to the Sarawak Electricity Supply Corporation (SESCO), which is so far the company’s one and only corporate client. Hidro is obligated to sell all its energy to SESCO, which then retails it to the population.

“We are allowed to sell separately but what we agreed with SESCO is that they are buying everything that we produce,” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

Bakun Dam is the second tallest concrete-faced rockfilled dam in the world and rises 236 metres above sea level.

The crest is 750 metres long and its entire system, including the swathe of land that had to be flooded, is almost the size of Singapore.

The power generated from the dam is crucial to the state’s ambitions to improve the economy through its Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy programme (SCORE). This includes the Samalaju Industrial Park, which is being powered by the Dam some 180 kilometres away. It is because of the power from Bakun that many of the world’s top companies, such as Japan’s Tokuyama Corporation and Hong Kong’s AML, have all decided to invest in the Samalaju project.

The Dam was originally planned to provide energy for the West Malaysian states, Sarawak and Sabah, but it was decided later to restrict power delivery to only Sarawak.

Tan Sri Izzudin said once Sarawak expands its energy capacity with up to 30 dams in the next few years, the government can look into the possibility of extending its power supply to neighbouring Sabah as well.

However, the priority is to ensure Sarawakians, even in remote areas, have easy access to power.

“We are working with the Ministry of Rural Development to provide electricity to villages around the area (of the dam),” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

The entire dam project will eventually involve eight giant turbines generating power. The first turbine started producing power on the 6th of August 2011. Since then, a new turbine is cranked into operation every two-three months until all eight are function smoothly to generate maximum power.

“Since the turbine came into operation providing energy, Sarawak has been taking all the energy that we produce,” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

The chairman has been closely involved in the Bakun Dam project since it was launched in 2002 with the initial dividing of the river.

Although talk of a possible dam in Sarawak started two decades ago, it was only nine years ago that the first serious steps were taken to ensure such a project become a reality.

“I was fortunate to be involved almost from day one in the project,” he said. “The idea of the project started almost 20 years ago.

“I was in the Ministry of Finance before and they asked me to be involved in this project, in the construction. And then they asked me to be chairman of Sarawak Hidro. I am very fortunate.”

Tan Sri Izzudin said once the entire dam project is complete, it would provide plenty of energy guarantees for foreign investors and entrepreneurs to set up tourism, industrial and agro-related businesses.

“Tourists coming here can chill out. There is a hotel based on the concept of longhouses. In the evenings you can go on a boat ride and see the sun setting. There is tremendous potential,” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

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The Bakun Dam in Sarawak is the centre point for the state’s power demands as it feeds heavy industries that need massive amounts of energy to survive. The company behind the dam, Sarawak Hidro, is confident the giant structure can fulfil its commitments.

The Bakun Dam in Sarawak is the centre point for the state’s power demands as it feeds heavy industries that need massive amounts of energy to survive. The company behind the dam, Sarawak Hidro, is confident the giant structure can fulfil its commitments.

Sarawak Hidro has taken on a massive burden to go with its massive dam – and the company is determined to fulfil its promises to the people and provide a reliable source of continuous energy while enhancing quality of life.

Tan Sri Izzudin Bin Dali, Chairman of Sarawak Hidro, said the huge Bakun Dam project will generate 2,400 megawatts of power, offering the region a fresh lifeline in terms of power and energy requirements.

“We want to ensure we meet all those targets that we have agreed,” said Tan Sri Izzudin. “Our objective over the next two years is to achieve all that we have promised and not have any technical problems.”

Sarawak Hidro’s commitments are to the people and to the Sarawak Electricity Supply Corporation (SESCO), which is so far the company’s one and only corporate client. Hidro is obligated to sell all its energy to SESCO, which then retails it to the population.

“We are allowed to sell separately but what we agreed with SESCO is that they are buying everything that we produce,” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

Bakun Dam is the second tallest concrete-faced rockfilled dam in the world and rises 236 metres above sea level.

The crest is 750 metres long and its entire system, including the swathe of land that had to be flooded, is almost the size of Singapore.

The power generated from the dam is crucial to the state’s ambitions to improve the economy through its Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy programme (SCORE). This includes the Samalaju Industrial Park, which is being powered by the Dam some 180 kilometres away. It is because of the power from Bakun that many of the world’s top companies, such as Japan’s Tokuyama Corporation and Hong Kong’s AML, have all decided to invest in the Samalaju project.

The Dam was originally planned to provide energy for the West Malaysian states, Sarawak and Sabah, but it was decided later to restrict power delivery to only Sarawak.

Tan Sri Izzudin said once Sarawak expands its energy capacity with up to 30 dams in the next few years, the government can look into the possibility of extending its power supply to neighbouring Sabah as well.

However, the priority is to ensure Sarawakians, even in remote areas, have easy access to power.

“We are working with the Ministry of Rural Development to provide electricity to villages around the area (of the dam),” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

The entire dam project will eventually involve eight giant turbines generating power. The first turbine started producing power on the 6th of August 2011. Since then, a new turbine is cranked into operation every two-three months until all eight are function smoothly to generate maximum power.

“Since the turbine came into operation providing energy, Sarawak has been taking all the energy that we produce,” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

The chairman has been closely involved in the Bakun Dam project since it was launched in 2002 with the initial dividing of the river.

Although talk of a possible dam in Sarawak started two decades ago, it was only nine years ago that the first serious steps were taken to ensure such a project become a reality.

“I was fortunate to be involved almost from day one in the project,” he said. “The idea of the project started almost 20 years ago.

“I was in the Ministry of Finance before and they asked me to be involved in this project, in the construction. And then they asked me to be chairman of Sarawak Hidro. I am very fortunate.”

Tan Sri Izzudin said once the entire dam project is complete, it would provide plenty of energy guarantees for foreign investors and entrepreneurs to set up tourism, industrial and agro-related businesses.

“Tourists coming here can chill out. There is a hotel based on the concept of longhouses. In the evenings you can go on a boat ride and see the sun setting. There is tremendous potential,” said Tan Sri Izzudin.

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