Saudi business center supports female entrepreneurs

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female-entrepreneurBusinesswomen of Saudi Arabia in cooperation with the Ministry of Social Affairs have taken upon themselves to help and empower the women of the Kingdom through the Al Manahil center in Riyadh, which is basically a center for beauty and physical fitness, founded in 1990 by six women as a leading local beauty, fitness and sports center in the Saudi capital, equipped with modern facilities.

But the members of the center are using their profit they earned for budding businesswomen through Deem Al Manahil Foundation, which selects and screens potential borrowers intending to set up their own businesses. The founding members include Princess Madawi bint Musaad, Princess Latifa bint Musaad, Princess Reema bint Sultan and Awatis Balghonain, Munaira Al Rashid Al Humaid and Pansa Al Rashid Al Humaid.

Ten young Saudi women have applied this year and their applications are being screened to determine their capability to start up and run a business. The Saudi Ministry of Social Affairs is coordinating with foundation’s activities.

The selected “entrepreneurs will each be granted 300,000 riyal once their applications are approved by a designated committee,” said Nadyah Al Jabr, Al Manahil’s general manager.

“Aspiring young entrepreneurs undergo training at the Deem Al Manahil before loans are granted,” she said. “Training is part of the foundation’s objective to help young Saudi women realize their aspirations.”

“Women who have been granted loans are so far successful in their endeavors. They have embarked upon various ventures, such as providing dessert catering services, setting up dress shops at malls and manufacturing uniforms and abayas,” she said.

“The foundation began helping young Saudi women with entrepreneurial skills three years ago. Before that, it was giving contributions to various charitable organisations,” she said.

“Young Saudi female entrepreneurs will pay back the amount within five years without interest,” he said. “Borrowers, however, should religiously stick to paying back their loans in monthly installments.” It also houses the British Council Institute for women and the Alliance Francaise.

“However, it’s more than just a wellness center. It has also been silently empowering Saudi women in society by helping young girls set up entrepreneurial projects,” said Al Jabr, who had earlier worked at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital as a human resource manager.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Businesswomen of Saudi Arabia in cooperation with the Ministry of Social Affairs have taken upon themselves to help and empower the women of the Kingdom through the Al Manahil center in Riyadh, which is basically a center for beauty and physical fitness, founded in 1990 by six women as a leading local beauty, fitness and sports center in the Saudi capital, equipped with modern facilities.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

female-entrepreneurBusinesswomen of Saudi Arabia in cooperation with the Ministry of Social Affairs have taken upon themselves to help and empower the women of the Kingdom through the Al Manahil center in Riyadh, which is basically a center for beauty and physical fitness, founded in 1990 by six women as a leading local beauty, fitness and sports center in the Saudi capital, equipped with modern facilities.

But the members of the center are using their profit they earned for budding businesswomen through Deem Al Manahil Foundation, which selects and screens potential borrowers intending to set up their own businesses. The founding members include Princess Madawi bint Musaad, Princess Latifa bint Musaad, Princess Reema bint Sultan and Awatis Balghonain, Munaira Al Rashid Al Humaid and Pansa Al Rashid Al Humaid.

Ten young Saudi women have applied this year and their applications are being screened to determine their capability to start up and run a business. The Saudi Ministry of Social Affairs is coordinating with foundation’s activities.

The selected “entrepreneurs will each be granted 300,000 riyal once their applications are approved by a designated committee,” said Nadyah Al Jabr, Al Manahil’s general manager.

“Aspiring young entrepreneurs undergo training at the Deem Al Manahil before loans are granted,” she said. “Training is part of the foundation’s objective to help young Saudi women realize their aspirations.”

“Women who have been granted loans are so far successful in their endeavors. They have embarked upon various ventures, such as providing dessert catering services, setting up dress shops at malls and manufacturing uniforms and abayas,” she said.

“The foundation began helping young Saudi women with entrepreneurial skills three years ago. Before that, it was giving contributions to various charitable organisations,” she said.

“Young Saudi female entrepreneurs will pay back the amount within five years without interest,” he said. “Borrowers, however, should religiously stick to paying back their loans in monthly installments.” It also houses the British Council Institute for women and the Alliance Francaise.

“However, it’s more than just a wellness center. It has also been silently empowering Saudi women in society by helping young girls set up entrepreneurial projects,” said Al Jabr, who had earlier worked at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital as a human resource manager.

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