Singapore anti-corruption official sacked for corruption

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Former CPIB Assistant Director Edwin Yeo
Former CPIB Assistant Director Edwin Yeo

The head of Singapore’s anti-corruption agency is resigning over corruption at his agency. According to a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office, Eric Tan, director of the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB), will step down following a recent scandal at the agency in which an assistant director was charged with embezzling some $1.7 million in public funds over a period of six years.

Tan is taking responsibility for negligently allowing the embezzlment to occur and will resign when his term ends on September 30. Tan will be succeeded by Wong Hong Kuan, who is now chief executive of the Singapore Workforce Development Agency.

Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau Assistant Director Edwin Yeo was charged in court on July 24 with 21 counts of criminal breach of trust, forgery and misappropriating property.

The statement released by the Prime Minister’s office reads, in part:

“Public institutions and public officers are held to the highest standards of integrity and conduct. … [The Prime Minister’s Office] is examining whether any supervisory lapses may have contributed to this incident. If so, it will take action against the officers responsible.

“As there have been a number of high profile cases recently, the public is understandably concerned about whether this reflects systemic issues in the Public Service. The Service itself is concerned about this.”

“Significantly, many cases were reported either by the public, or by officers in the public service. This suggests a strong culture in Singapore and in the Public Service which rejects corruption.”

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Former CPIB Assistant Director Edwin Yeo

The head of Singapore’s anti-corruption agency is resigning over corruption at his agency. According to a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office, Eric Tan, director of the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB), will step down following a recent scandal at the agency in which an assistant director was charged with embezzling some $1.7 million in public funds over a period of six years.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Former CPIB Assistant Director Edwin Yeo
Former CPIB Assistant Director Edwin Yeo

The head of Singapore’s anti-corruption agency is resigning over corruption at his agency. According to a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office, Eric Tan, director of the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB), will step down following a recent scandal at the agency in which an assistant director was charged with embezzling some $1.7 million in public funds over a period of six years.

Tan is taking responsibility for negligently allowing the embezzlment to occur and will resign when his term ends on September 30. Tan will be succeeded by Wong Hong Kuan, who is now chief executive of the Singapore Workforce Development Agency.

Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau Assistant Director Edwin Yeo was charged in court on July 24 with 21 counts of criminal breach of trust, forgery and misappropriating property.

The statement released by the Prime Minister’s office reads, in part:

“Public institutions and public officers are held to the highest standards of integrity and conduct. … [The Prime Minister’s Office] is examining whether any supervisory lapses may have contributed to this incident. If so, it will take action against the officers responsible.

“As there have been a number of high profile cases recently, the public is understandably concerned about whether this reflects systemic issues in the Public Service. The Service itself is concerned about this.”

“Significantly, many cases were reported either by the public, or by officers in the public service. This suggests a strong culture in Singapore and in the Public Service which rejects corruption.”

 

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