Singapore breaking new ground in motion-controlled computing

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Imotion1A Singapore-based tech startup called Intellect Motion has developed the next generation of motion-controlled software. This software is controlled by a wearable wireless motion detection device called the IMotion that allows the user to play online games, browse the web, operate apps and computer programmes, and more by waving his or her hands in the air. The IMotion captures full 3D body movements and is 10 times more accurate than Microsoft’s Kinect 1, the precursor to the IMotion.

This new technology has been widely compared to that which Tom Cruise famously used in the 2002 film Minority Report. Like in the movie, IMotion users will be able to direct complex computer activity by standing in front of a television screen and gesturing like a symphony composer.

The IMotion’s wearable device links to the motion-detection software on the user’s computer via the built-in video camera found in any standard PC. The PC can then be connected to a large flat screen television to produce the Minority Report effect.

This technology was originally developed as a form of exercise, much like Nintendo’s Wii gaming system. The IMotion can be supplemented with additional features, like a balancing pad, to increase the intensity of the workout. These additional features, and even the wearable motion detection devices, are also designed to respond to an online gaming environment. Thus, if a gamer is using the balancing pad in a skiing game, the pad will move in reaction to changes in the terrain. And if a gamer is playing a shooting game, the wearable devices will pulsate to register gunshot wounds received.  The devices, when worn on the hands, even allow the wearer to ‘feel’ simulated 3D objects on the screen.

But the applications of the IMotion technology have evolved well beyond gaming, and will continue evolving, whether with this product or the next of its kind. This is a big step in the direction of motion-controlled telecommunications and computing, which suddenly seems a much nearer-term reality.

Intellect Motion is relying on crowd-funding to bring this product to market via Kickstarter, a crowd-funding service where the contributors are more like donors than investors. The public release of IMotion is set for December 15 of this year.

Here is a demo video:

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

A Singapore-based tech startup called Intellect Motion has developed the next generation of motion-controlled software. This software is controlled by a wearable wireless motion detection device called the IMotion that allows the user to play online games, browse the web, operate apps and computer programmes, and more by waving his or her hands in the air. The IMotion captures full 3D body movements and is 10 times more accurate than Microsoft’s Kinect 1, the precursor to the IMotion.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Imotion1A Singapore-based tech startup called Intellect Motion has developed the next generation of motion-controlled software. This software is controlled by a wearable wireless motion detection device called the IMotion that allows the user to play online games, browse the web, operate apps and computer programmes, and more by waving his or her hands in the air. The IMotion captures full 3D body movements and is 10 times more accurate than Microsoft’s Kinect 1, the precursor to the IMotion.

This new technology has been widely compared to that which Tom Cruise famously used in the 2002 film Minority Report. Like in the movie, IMotion users will be able to direct complex computer activity by standing in front of a television screen and gesturing like a symphony composer.

The IMotion’s wearable device links to the motion-detection software on the user’s computer via the built-in video camera found in any standard PC. The PC can then be connected to a large flat screen television to produce the Minority Report effect.

This technology was originally developed as a form of exercise, much like Nintendo’s Wii gaming system. The IMotion can be supplemented with additional features, like a balancing pad, to increase the intensity of the workout. These additional features, and even the wearable motion detection devices, are also designed to respond to an online gaming environment. Thus, if a gamer is using the balancing pad in a skiing game, the pad will move in reaction to changes in the terrain. And if a gamer is playing a shooting game, the wearable devices will pulsate to register gunshot wounds received.  The devices, when worn on the hands, even allow the wearer to ‘feel’ simulated 3D objects on the screen.

But the applications of the IMotion technology have evolved well beyond gaming, and will continue evolving, whether with this product or the next of its kind. This is a big step in the direction of motion-controlled telecommunications and computing, which suddenly seems a much nearer-term reality.

Intellect Motion is relying on crowd-funding to bring this product to market via Kickstarter, a crowd-funding service where the contributors are more like donors than investors. The public release of IMotion is set for December 15 of this year.

Here is a demo video:

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