Singapore first to run ‘Super Wi-Fi’ in Asia

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The already highly digitalised city-state of Singapore just got more connected. Software giant Microsoft, StarHub, Singapore’s second largest mobile operator, the Institute for Infocomm Research, a government research arm, and several other partners are spearheading a new wireless project that utilises unused parts of low-frequency television bands, known as “white spaces,” to transmit data.

Super Wi-Fi – which technically doesn’t even employ Wi-Fi technology – can travel further and penetrate walls and other obstacles such as trees better than current high-frequency alternatives.

StarHub is looking to implement the technology to provide better offshore internet access to the many ships docking in Singapore.

Singapore’s introduction of the technology makes it the first in Asia. Otherwhere on the globe, Super Wi–Fi has already been launched in North Carolina (US), and the UK plans to tailor a regulatory framework to establish a network as well.

Explosive growth in wireless data traffic over the past years has severely strained existing infrastructure on the island, making the need for innovation solutions imperative.

Kenya, Brazil, Japan, Uruguay and South Korea have begun pilot runs of the technology, as well as other countries throughout North America and Europe.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

The already highly digitalised city-state of Singapore just got more connected. Software giant Microsoft, StarHub, Singapore’s second largest mobile operator, the Institute for Infocomm Research, a government research arm, and several other partners are spearheading a new wireless project that utilises unused parts of low-frequency television bands, known as “white spaces,” to transmit data.

Reading Time: 1 minute

The already highly digitalised city-state of Singapore just got more connected. Software giant Microsoft, StarHub, Singapore’s second largest mobile operator, the Institute for Infocomm Research, a government research arm, and several other partners are spearheading a new wireless project that utilises unused parts of low-frequency television bands, known as “white spaces,” to transmit data.

Super Wi-Fi – which technically doesn’t even employ Wi-Fi technology – can travel further and penetrate walls and other obstacles such as trees better than current high-frequency alternatives.

StarHub is looking to implement the technology to provide better offshore internet access to the many ships docking in Singapore.

Singapore’s introduction of the technology makes it the first in Asia. Otherwhere on the globe, Super Wi–Fi has already been launched in North Carolina (US), and the UK plans to tailor a regulatory framework to establish a network as well.

Explosive growth in wireless data traffic over the past years has severely strained existing infrastructure on the island, making the need for innovation solutions imperative.

Kenya, Brazil, Japan, Uruguay and South Korea have begun pilot runs of the technology, as well as other countries throughout North America and Europe.

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