Singapore has world’s best infrastructure

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The city state of Singapore tops the City Infrastructure Ranking 2012, released by US-based consulting firm Mercer. Singapore also ranks best among ASEAN cities in the consulter’s new Quality of Living Survey 2012.

Mercer was looking at factors such as electricity, water availability, telephone connections, mail, public transportation, traffic congestion and airport effectiveness in the infrastructure ranking.

For city infrastructure, Singapore has the highest ranking worldwide and, in Asia-Pacific, is followed by Hong Kong (6), Sydney (8), Perth (25), Tokyo (32) and Melbourne (34). Adelaide and Brisbane both ranked 37. Nagoya (41), Auckland (43), Kobe (44), Wellington (48), Seoul (50) and Osaka (51) are the next highest-ranking cities in this region. The region’s lowest-ranking city for city infrastructure is Dhaka, Bangladesh (205). No other ASEAN city ranked in the top 50 of the infrastructure list.

“A noticeable gap can be seen among Asia-Pacific cities where several cities have improved in the region partly because they have been investing massively in infrastructure and public services,” said Slagin Parakatil, Senior Researcher at Mercer.

“Competition among municipalities has been continuously increasing in order to attract multinationals, foreigners, expatriates and tourists. Yet a considerable number of Asian cities rank in the bottom quartile, mainly due to high political volatility, poor infrastructure and obsolete public services,” he added.

Quality of Living

Singapore remains the highest-ranking Asian city at rank 25 in the Quality of Living Survey followed by Japanese cities Tokyo (44), Kobe (48), Yokohama (49) and Osaka (57). Hong Kong (70), Seoul (75), Kuala Lumpur (80), Taipei (85) and Shanghai (95) are other major Asian cities ranked in the top 100. Bangkok ranked 115, Manila 128, Jakarta 138 and Hanoi 147.

The region’s lowest-ranking cities are Dhaka, Bangladesh (203); Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (204); and Dushanbe, Tajikistan (207).

However, taking Asia-Pacific as a whole, Australia took the lead. Auckland (3) retains its position as the highest-ranking city for quality of living in the region. Sydney follows at 10, Wellington at 13, Melbourne at 17 and Perth at 21.

Globally, Austria’s capital Vienna retains the top spot as the city with the world’s best quality of living for the fourth time in a row. Zurich and, as mentioned, Auckland follow in second and third place, respectively, and Munich is in fourth place, followed by Vancouver, which ranked fifth. Düsseldorf dropped one spot to rank sixth followed by Frankfurt in seventh, Geneva in eighth, Copenhagen in ninth, and Bern and Sydney tied for tenth place.

In the US, Honolulu (28) and San Francisco (29) are the highest-ranking cities, followed by Boston (35). Chicago is ranked 42nd, while Washington, DC, is ranked 43rd. Detroit (71) is the lowest-ranking of the US cities that Mercer surveys.

Globally, the cities with the lowest quality of living are Khartoum, Sudan (217); N’Djamena, Chad (218); Port-au-Prince, Haiti (219); and Bangui, Central African Republic (220). Baghdad, Iraq (221) ranks last.

Mercer analyses living conditions according to 39 factors, grouped in categories such as political, social and economic environment, socio-cultural environment, medical and health considerations, schools and education, public services, recreation facilities, consumer goods, housing costs and natural environment. Its findings are a guideline for multinational corporations to determine compensation packages for staff being sent abroad.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The city state of Singapore tops the City Infrastructure Ranking 2012, released by US-based consulting firm Mercer. Singapore also ranks best among ASEAN cities in the consulter’s new Quality of Living Survey 2012.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The city state of Singapore tops the City Infrastructure Ranking 2012, released by US-based consulting firm Mercer. Singapore also ranks best among ASEAN cities in the consulter’s new Quality of Living Survey 2012.

Mercer was looking at factors such as electricity, water availability, telephone connections, mail, public transportation, traffic congestion and airport effectiveness in the infrastructure ranking.

For city infrastructure, Singapore has the highest ranking worldwide and, in Asia-Pacific, is followed by Hong Kong (6), Sydney (8), Perth (25), Tokyo (32) and Melbourne (34). Adelaide and Brisbane both ranked 37. Nagoya (41), Auckland (43), Kobe (44), Wellington (48), Seoul (50) and Osaka (51) are the next highest-ranking cities in this region. The region’s lowest-ranking city for city infrastructure is Dhaka, Bangladesh (205). No other ASEAN city ranked in the top 50 of the infrastructure list.

“A noticeable gap can be seen among Asia-Pacific cities where several cities have improved in the region partly because they have been investing massively in infrastructure and public services,” said Slagin Parakatil, Senior Researcher at Mercer.

“Competition among municipalities has been continuously increasing in order to attract multinationals, foreigners, expatriates and tourists. Yet a considerable number of Asian cities rank in the bottom quartile, mainly due to high political volatility, poor infrastructure and obsolete public services,” he added.

Quality of Living

Singapore remains the highest-ranking Asian city at rank 25 in the Quality of Living Survey followed by Japanese cities Tokyo (44), Kobe (48), Yokohama (49) and Osaka (57). Hong Kong (70), Seoul (75), Kuala Lumpur (80), Taipei (85) and Shanghai (95) are other major Asian cities ranked in the top 100. Bangkok ranked 115, Manila 128, Jakarta 138 and Hanoi 147.

The region’s lowest-ranking cities are Dhaka, Bangladesh (203); Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (204); and Dushanbe, Tajikistan (207).

However, taking Asia-Pacific as a whole, Australia took the lead. Auckland (3) retains its position as the highest-ranking city for quality of living in the region. Sydney follows at 10, Wellington at 13, Melbourne at 17 and Perth at 21.

Globally, Austria’s capital Vienna retains the top spot as the city with the world’s best quality of living for the fourth time in a row. Zurich and, as mentioned, Auckland follow in second and third place, respectively, and Munich is in fourth place, followed by Vancouver, which ranked fifth. Düsseldorf dropped one spot to rank sixth followed by Frankfurt in seventh, Geneva in eighth, Copenhagen in ninth, and Bern and Sydney tied for tenth place.

In the US, Honolulu (28) and San Francisco (29) are the highest-ranking cities, followed by Boston (35). Chicago is ranked 42nd, while Washington, DC, is ranked 43rd. Detroit (71) is the lowest-ranking of the US cities that Mercer surveys.

Globally, the cities with the lowest quality of living are Khartoum, Sudan (217); N’Djamena, Chad (218); Port-au-Prince, Haiti (219); and Bangui, Central African Republic (220). Baghdad, Iraq (221) ranks last.

Mercer analyses living conditions according to 39 factors, grouped in categories such as political, social and economic environment, socio-cultural environment, medical and health considerations, schools and education, public services, recreation facilities, consumer goods, housing costs and natural environment. Its findings are a guideline for multinational corporations to determine compensation packages for staff being sent abroad.

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