Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines surge in world talent ranking, Thailand drops

Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines Surge In World Talent Ranking, Thailand Drops

Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines advanced in the World Talent Ranking 2019 just released by Switzerland’s IMD World Competitiveness Center, while Thailand was the only loser among five surveyed Southeast Asian countries.

Singapore jumped three notches to rank ten as compared to last year, overtaking Germany (rank 11) and entering the global top ten for the first time. The city state did very well in the readiness category which measures the availability of skills and competencies in the talent pool. The other nine in the top ten are exclusively European countries, with the top ten being Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden.

Malaysia remained unchanged on rank 22, while Indonesia gained four notches and now rests on rank 41, overtaking Thailand to become third-best for talent in Southeast Asia. The country did specifically well in the readiness category and also improved its appeal, which measures cost of living, worker motivation, salaries, taxation, retaining talent and quality of life..

The Philippines gained the most, six notches, to rank 49.  The country gained the most in the appeal category, as well as in readiness, with the best factors being a skilled labour force, low cost of living, language skills, number of science graduates and an effective personal income tax rate.

Thailand, on the other hand, slipped one point to rank 41, mainly owing to a sharp drop in appeal of the country in terms of talent. It ranked worst in the factors primary and secondary education, university education and student skills, finance skills language skills, management education and remuneration in services professions. Exposure to particle pollution remains another issue.

“In the long term, if Thailand’s talent competitiveness severely declines, it may fail to satisfy demand, which could curtail the sustainability of value creation in the economy,” Jose Caballero, senior economist of IMD Business School in Switzerland and Singapore, said.

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Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines advanced in the World Talent Ranking 2019 just released by Switzerland’s IMD World Competitiveness Center, while Thailand was the only loser among five surveyed Southeast Asian countries. Singapore jumped three notches to rank ten as compared to last year, overtaking Germany (rank 11) and entering the global top ten for the first time. The city state did very well in the readiness category which measures the availability of skills and competencies in the talent pool. The other nine in the top ten are exclusively European countries, with the top ten being Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden....

Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines Surge In World Talent Ranking, Thailand Drops

Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines advanced in the World Talent Ranking 2019 just released by Switzerland’s IMD World Competitiveness Center, while Thailand was the only loser among five surveyed Southeast Asian countries.

Singapore jumped three notches to rank ten as compared to last year, overtaking Germany (rank 11) and entering the global top ten for the first time. The city state did very well in the readiness category which measures the availability of skills and competencies in the talent pool. The other nine in the top ten are exclusively European countries, with the top ten being Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden.

Malaysia remained unchanged on rank 22, while Indonesia gained four notches and now rests on rank 41, overtaking Thailand to become third-best for talent in Southeast Asia. The country did specifically well in the readiness category and also improved its appeal, which measures cost of living, worker motivation, salaries, taxation, retaining talent and quality of life..

The Philippines gained the most, six notches, to rank 49.  The country gained the most in the appeal category, as well as in readiness, with the best factors being a skilled labour force, low cost of living, language skills, number of science graduates and an effective personal income tax rate.

Thailand, on the other hand, slipped one point to rank 41, mainly owing to a sharp drop in appeal of the country in terms of talent. It ranked worst in the factors primary and secondary education, university education and student skills, finance skills language skills, management education and remuneration in services professions. Exposure to particle pollution remains another issue.

“In the long term, if Thailand’s talent competitiveness severely declines, it may fail to satisfy demand, which could curtail the sustainability of value creation in the economy,” Jose Caballero, senior economist of IMD Business School in Switzerland and Singapore, said.

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