Singapore’s urban farming industry blossoms

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Singapore urban farmingUrban farming is taking root in Singapore as the city-state’s wealthy, cosmopolitan population discovers the joys of growing their own vegetables.

Green Valley Farm started as a large organic vegetable garden within the city limits in 1999. In 2003, the company shifted its business model to allow Singaporeans to rent plots of land within the farm and plant and cultivate the produce themselves.

The idea was a hit, so much so that a waiting list quickly developed with waits as long as four years, according to The Straits Times newspaper. Naturally other entrepreneurs sensed an opportunity, and in 2008 D’Kranji Farm Resort opened its doors to the public.

D’Kranji took the idea pioneered by Green Valley to the next level. People flocked to Green Valley not only for the organic produce, but for the total experience of getting out of the crowded city center and on to a peaceful green space where they could get a little exercise and enjoy the healthy atmosphere. D’Kranji is farther from the city center than Green Valley and bills itself as a countryside retreat, offering amenities like dining and guided tours of nearby farms.

Last year Singapore’s third such venture began operations. Sky and Land Organic Agriculture emphasizes an all-natural ethos, and strictly forbids the use of fertilisers and pesticides. The company has patented its own methods of organic farming and uses them on the site, but otherwise Sky and Land operates in the same manner as it two rivals.

The confines of city life can be maddening, and Singaporeans are apparently taking to this form of recreation with gusto. The population’s desire for easy-to-reach nature excursions combined with a growing taste for organic produce is making urban farming a profitable local industry. According to The Straits Times, the three Singapore farms charge between $197 and $798 per month to rent plots of land. Services like farming consultations, and goods such as seeds and tools, are available for additional fees.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Urban farming is taking root in Singapore as the city-state’s wealthy, cosmopolitan population discovers the joys of growing their own vegetables.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Singapore urban farmingUrban farming is taking root in Singapore as the city-state’s wealthy, cosmopolitan population discovers the joys of growing their own vegetables.

Green Valley Farm started as a large organic vegetable garden within the city limits in 1999. In 2003, the company shifted its business model to allow Singaporeans to rent plots of land within the farm and plant and cultivate the produce themselves.

The idea was a hit, so much so that a waiting list quickly developed with waits as long as four years, according to The Straits Times newspaper. Naturally other entrepreneurs sensed an opportunity, and in 2008 D’Kranji Farm Resort opened its doors to the public.

D’Kranji took the idea pioneered by Green Valley to the next level. People flocked to Green Valley not only for the organic produce, but for the total experience of getting out of the crowded city center and on to a peaceful green space where they could get a little exercise and enjoy the healthy atmosphere. D’Kranji is farther from the city center than Green Valley and bills itself as a countryside retreat, offering amenities like dining and guided tours of nearby farms.

Last year Singapore’s third such venture began operations. Sky and Land Organic Agriculture emphasizes an all-natural ethos, and strictly forbids the use of fertilisers and pesticides. The company has patented its own methods of organic farming and uses them on the site, but otherwise Sky and Land operates in the same manner as it two rivals.

The confines of city life can be maddening, and Singaporeans are apparently taking to this form of recreation with gusto. The population’s desire for easy-to-reach nature excursions combined with a growing taste for organic produce is making urban farming a profitable local industry. According to The Straits Times, the three Singapore farms charge between $197 and $798 per month to rent plots of land. Services like farming consultations, and goods such as seeds and tools, are available for additional fees.

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