Sound victory for Singapore’s ruling party

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Lee Hsieng Hoong
Relief for Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsieng Loong

It was the 12th time in a row that the People’s Action Party (PAP) won the Singapore’s general elections, but this time it came as a relief for Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, who had been working to overcome his party’s worst showing ever in an election four years ago.

Successfully, as it seems.

The PAP, launched in 1854 by Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore’s modern founder who died in March, won 83 of 89 contested seats in parliament and captured nearly 70 per cent of the vote. It was the best performance since 1991 for the party, which has governed continuously since the city state became independent in 1965. In 2011, the party won just about 60 per cent of the popular vote.

“It was a good result for the PAP, but an excellent result for Singapore,” Prime Minister Lee commented.

“The results are also an endorsement of the policies and the performance of the PAP government,” he added.

Singapore-parliamentIt seems that Singapore voters weren’t overall convinced of the power of the main challenger, the center-left Workers’ Party, which retained it six seats in parliament, to press through with social democratic ideology and “checks-and-balances” demands towards the ruling party.

Since the weak result in the previous elections, the PAP enacted a series of measures focused at the less fortunate, including subsidised health care, improvements in public transport  in public transport and efforts to make home-buying easier. It also restricted the inflow of foreign workers who are perceived to be taking jobs from Singaporeans. Otherwise it retained its unique ideological mix of conservatism, multiracialism, meritocracy and “Asian values” as opposed to Western democratic values.

No other part won any seats. Singapore Democratic Party clocked the third-best result as per number of votes, followed by National Solidarity Party and Party.

Of the two independent candidates, social activist Han Hui Hui was relatively successful in her constituency Radin Mas, a district mainly occupied by blue collar workers. She clocked 2,629 votes, or 10.04 per cent of total votes in the district.

Salim Samir Neji, a last-minute surprise candidate in the Bukit Batong constituency, got 150 votes or 0.6 per cent of total votes in the district.

SG elections

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[caption id="attachment_26510" align="alignleft" width="300"] Relief for Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsieng Loong[/caption] It was the 12th time in a row that the People's Action Party (PAP) won the Singapore's general elections, but this time it came as a relief for Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, who had been working to overcome his party's worst showing ever in an election four years ago. Successfully, as it seems. The PAP, launched in 1854 by Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore’s modern founder who died in March, won 83 of 89 contested seats in parliament and captured nearly 70 per cent of the vote. It...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Lee Hsieng Hoong
Relief for Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsieng Loong

It was the 12th time in a row that the People’s Action Party (PAP) won the Singapore’s general elections, but this time it came as a relief for Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, who had been working to overcome his party’s worst showing ever in an election four years ago.

Successfully, as it seems.

The PAP, launched in 1854 by Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore’s modern founder who died in March, won 83 of 89 contested seats in parliament and captured nearly 70 per cent of the vote. It was the best performance since 1991 for the party, which has governed continuously since the city state became independent in 1965. In 2011, the party won just about 60 per cent of the popular vote.

“It was a good result for the PAP, but an excellent result for Singapore,” Prime Minister Lee commented.

“The results are also an endorsement of the policies and the performance of the PAP government,” he added.

Singapore-parliamentIt seems that Singapore voters weren’t overall convinced of the power of the main challenger, the center-left Workers’ Party, which retained it six seats in parliament, to press through with social democratic ideology and “checks-and-balances” demands towards the ruling party.

Since the weak result in the previous elections, the PAP enacted a series of measures focused at the less fortunate, including subsidised health care, improvements in public transport  in public transport and efforts to make home-buying easier. It also restricted the inflow of foreign workers who are perceived to be taking jobs from Singaporeans. Otherwise it retained its unique ideological mix of conservatism, multiracialism, meritocracy and “Asian values” as opposed to Western democratic values.

No other part won any seats. Singapore Democratic Party clocked the third-best result as per number of votes, followed by National Solidarity Party and Party.

Of the two independent candidates, social activist Han Hui Hui was relatively successful in her constituency Radin Mas, a district mainly occupied by blue collar workers. She clocked 2,629 votes, or 10.04 per cent of total votes in the district.

Salim Samir Neji, a last-minute surprise candidate in the Bukit Batong constituency, got 150 votes or 0.6 per cent of total votes in the district.

SG elections

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