Southeast Asia a forerunner in green projects

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The Diamond Building in Putrajaya, the administrative capital of Malaysia, was the first building to be awarded the Malaysian Green Building Index Platinum award in 2011

Sustainability projects have been the focus of global efforts to manage resources and create long-term plans to improve cost efficiency in energy generation and consumption.

By Sheree McDonald

Southeast Asia is a forerunner in incorporating green projects in current business developments specifically in key areas of carbon reduction technology, energy efficiency, renewable energy, organic farming and green buildings, while also being mindful of investment opportunities and the effects on the region’s overall economy.

Malaysia focuses on including technology sustainability in businesses. While large businesses are normally able to invest in energy saving technology on their own, it remains a challenge for small and medium enterprises to fund such projects on a larger scale.  Because of this, the Malaysian government is granting certain tax incentives that make it easier and more cost efficient for smaller businesses to incorporate energy saving technology as well as attract more investors to their cause. One major focus lies on ‘green’ buildings that pass a Green Building Index (GBI) rating. Investments into sustainable building technology to achieve a GBI rating are 100 per cent tax-deductable.

Furthermore, renewable energy such as biomass, biogas, hydropower and solar power are also eligible for tax breaks in Malaysia. Such tax breaks include tax exemption of 100 per cent of statutory income for ten years of business or qualifying capital expenditure set off by 100 per cent of statutory income for the first five years of business.

Singapore has a global reputation as being a ‘green and clean’ city that puts emphasis on projects that are both energy saving and economically stimulating. The Singapore government has launched an Environmental and Water Technologies initiative, which has proven to be a launch pad for 35 sustainability projects so far. In particular, the Clean Energy Research and Testbedding Programme turned out to be quite successful, a $17 million project that allows for various companies to developed and test new clean energy technologies before they are eventually put on the market.

Papaya trees on an organic farm in Thailand

Thailand is a hotspot for organic farming that connects tourism with the positive impacts on the environment that are gained through chemical-free farming. Situated in Sukhothai province in the country’s northeast, the Organic Agriculture project attracts visitors to have a look at an entirely organic farm. They have the opportunity to work hands on in the 150 acre fields, watch a presentation overview, and learn how to cook with local vegetables, or participate in a three-day training activity. This project relies on the participation of tourism stakeholders from the public and private sectors. With success, it seems: the project recently won the Pacific Asia Travel Association’s PATA Gold Award on Environment Ecotourism.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Diamond Building in Putrajaya, the administrative capital of Malaysia, was the first building to be awarded the Malaysian Green Building Index Platinum award in 2011

Sustainability projects have been the focus of global efforts to manage resources and create long-term plans to improve cost efficiency in energy generation and consumption.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The Diamond Building in Putrajaya, the administrative capital of Malaysia, was the first building to be awarded the Malaysian Green Building Index Platinum award in 2011

Sustainability projects have been the focus of global efforts to manage resources and create long-term plans to improve cost efficiency in energy generation and consumption.

By Sheree McDonald

Southeast Asia is a forerunner in incorporating green projects in current business developments specifically in key areas of carbon reduction technology, energy efficiency, renewable energy, organic farming and green buildings, while also being mindful of investment opportunities and the effects on the region’s overall economy.

Malaysia focuses on including technology sustainability in businesses. While large businesses are normally able to invest in energy saving technology on their own, it remains a challenge for small and medium enterprises to fund such projects on a larger scale.  Because of this, the Malaysian government is granting certain tax incentives that make it easier and more cost efficient for smaller businesses to incorporate energy saving technology as well as attract more investors to their cause. One major focus lies on ‘green’ buildings that pass a Green Building Index (GBI) rating. Investments into sustainable building technology to achieve a GBI rating are 100 per cent tax-deductable.

Furthermore, renewable energy such as biomass, biogas, hydropower and solar power are also eligible for tax breaks in Malaysia. Such tax breaks include tax exemption of 100 per cent of statutory income for ten years of business or qualifying capital expenditure set off by 100 per cent of statutory income for the first five years of business.

Singapore has a global reputation as being a ‘green and clean’ city that puts emphasis on projects that are both energy saving and economically stimulating. The Singapore government has launched an Environmental and Water Technologies initiative, which has proven to be a launch pad for 35 sustainability projects so far. In particular, the Clean Energy Research and Testbedding Programme turned out to be quite successful, a $17 million project that allows for various companies to developed and test new clean energy technologies before they are eventually put on the market.

Papaya trees on an organic farm in Thailand

Thailand is a hotspot for organic farming that connects tourism with the positive impacts on the environment that are gained through chemical-free farming. Situated in Sukhothai province in the country’s northeast, the Organic Agriculture project attracts visitors to have a look at an entirely organic farm. They have the opportunity to work hands on in the 150 acre fields, watch a presentation overview, and learn how to cook with local vegetables, or participate in a three-day training activity. This project relies on the participation of tourism stakeholders from the public and private sectors. With success, it seems: the project recently won the Pacific Asia Travel Association’s PATA Gold Award on Environment Ecotourism.

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