Southeast Asia a hotbed for pirates

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piratesMany might think the waters off the coast of Somalia are worse with regards to pirates, but in fact Southeast Asia is worst, The Australian reported.

Indonesia has experienced a more than 50 per cent surge in pirate attacks in the first half of 2013. Of the 48 attacks reported, 43 involved pirates boarding vessels and assaulting the crew, the International Maritime Bureau announced. Most incidents took place in the waters around the Riau province, particularly around the ports in Dumai and BelawanIn just the seven days up to October 25, three ships have been attacked in Indonesian waters alone.

Other attacks were recorded in the Singapore Straits, in Malaysian waters, in the Straits of Malacca and in the PhilippinesThis compares to just eight off Somalia in the same period. Crews have been held at gunpoint, tied up and valuables stolen.

The masked bandits usually armed with machetes and sometimes guns, creep aboard at night or just before dawn when the vessels are at anchor. They go about their business and speed away to the jungles of Sumatra or Java.

Shipping industry experts say piracy is moving back to its former heartland in the seas around Indonesia. As fuel becomes one of shipping’s biggest expenses, pirates are targeting valuable cargoes of highly saleable and easily transferred oil – in some cases operating on the high seas as floating pumps for below-cost stolen bunker oil that is transferred from ship to ship.

“The statistics would seem to suggest it’s on the rise in Asia,” an industry source from a Hong Kong-based ship management company told CNN.

“It’s now very dangerous for slow vessels with low freeboards to pass through piracy areas.”

Pirates have favoured Southeast Asian waters for centuries, picking off traders who sailed through the Straits of Malacca to and from India and China. Estimates suggest that around one-third of the world’s trade still moves through this waterway, so it is no surprise that piracy continues to thrive there.

Boat people fleeing Vietnam after the war were routinely targeted by merciless gangs who murdered and raped at will – showing no mercy even to small children.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Many might think the waters off the coast of Somalia are worse with regards to pirates, but in fact Southeast Asia is worst, The Australian reported.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

piratesMany might think the waters off the coast of Somalia are worse with regards to pirates, but in fact Southeast Asia is worst, The Australian reported.

Indonesia has experienced a more than 50 per cent surge in pirate attacks in the first half of 2013. Of the 48 attacks reported, 43 involved pirates boarding vessels and assaulting the crew, the International Maritime Bureau announced. Most incidents took place in the waters around the Riau province, particularly around the ports in Dumai and BelawanIn just the seven days up to October 25, three ships have been attacked in Indonesian waters alone.

Other attacks were recorded in the Singapore Straits, in Malaysian waters, in the Straits of Malacca and in the PhilippinesThis compares to just eight off Somalia in the same period. Crews have been held at gunpoint, tied up and valuables stolen.

The masked bandits usually armed with machetes and sometimes guns, creep aboard at night or just before dawn when the vessels are at anchor. They go about their business and speed away to the jungles of Sumatra or Java.

Shipping industry experts say piracy is moving back to its former heartland in the seas around Indonesia. As fuel becomes one of shipping’s biggest expenses, pirates are targeting valuable cargoes of highly saleable and easily transferred oil – in some cases operating on the high seas as floating pumps for below-cost stolen bunker oil that is transferred from ship to ship.

“The statistics would seem to suggest it’s on the rise in Asia,” an industry source from a Hong Kong-based ship management company told CNN.

“It’s now very dangerous for slow vessels with low freeboards to pass through piracy areas.”

Pirates have favoured Southeast Asian waters for centuries, picking off traders who sailed through the Straits of Malacca to and from India and China. Estimates suggest that around one-third of the world’s trade still moves through this waterway, so it is no surprise that piracy continues to thrive there.

Boat people fleeing Vietnam after the war were routinely targeted by merciless gangs who murdered and raped at will – showing no mercy even to small children.

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