Spotlight: ASEAN to discuss haze in Brunei

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Haze9In search for a culprit to ending the haze phenomena that plagues Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia every year, ASEAN should embark on a soul-searching voyage within. That the haze that settled across Singapore, ASEAN’s de facto financial heart, was the worst ever recorded could finally bring meaningful talks.

The placement of blame, health catastrophe and possible solutions surrounding the dense haze were talking points during a discussion held via Twitter by Inside Investor on June 28.

The ASEAN Regional Forum, which will include the US, China and Russia, will commence on June 29, with talks by foreign ministers expected to address the haze on July 2. This will be the first time a high-level discussion including Singapore will be involved in such talks.

“Imagining ASEAN working together would boost much needed morale and open up the doors of progression,” Alex Williams tweeted.

Besides morale, the cost and health concerns will undoubtedly follow, or at least it’s hoped.

The lead up to the pressure to move policy is not small. Two have deceased since the haze began in earnest on June 21, according to the China Press, which reported that a housewife and an elderly man died in the southern Malaysian city of Muar, where the Pollution Standard Index (PSI) reached “unhealthy” levels.

In Singapore, the government rushed to put medical subsidies in place, targeting poor by making medical clinics available.

Despite shrugging off blame, Sime Darby has become placed in the crosshairs of the debate.

“Sime Darby owns 93 plantations in Indonesia,” a user by the name @thevikas said.

Some of the hotspots have been connected to land that they own, but the titles and ownership is tricky to pinpoint.

This is just a round-robin blame game, however. The same that has spurred Indonesia to be begin rounding up farmers that have been accused of the fires.

ASEAN members need to identify those owners of the land deeds involved in Riau province and make a concertedly effort next week to build mechanisms to help Indonesia enforcement forestry laws that are clearly being sidelined.

That it took this long only puts further pressure to act now.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

In search for a culprit to ending the haze phenomena that plagues Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia every year, ASEAN should embark on a soul-searching voyage within. That the haze that settled across Singapore, ASEAN’s de facto financial heart, was the worst ever recorded could finally bring meaningful talks.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Haze9In search for a culprit to ending the haze phenomena that plagues Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia every year, ASEAN should embark on a soul-searching voyage within. That the haze that settled across Singapore, ASEAN’s de facto financial heart, was the worst ever recorded could finally bring meaningful talks.

The placement of blame, health catastrophe and possible solutions surrounding the dense haze were talking points during a discussion held via Twitter by Inside Investor on June 28.

The ASEAN Regional Forum, which will include the US, China and Russia, will commence on June 29, with talks by foreign ministers expected to address the haze on July 2. This will be the first time a high-level discussion including Singapore will be involved in such talks.

“Imagining ASEAN working together would boost much needed morale and open up the doors of progression,” Alex Williams tweeted.

Besides morale, the cost and health concerns will undoubtedly follow, or at least it’s hoped.

The lead up to the pressure to move policy is not small. Two have deceased since the haze began in earnest on June 21, according to the China Press, which reported that a housewife and an elderly man died in the southern Malaysian city of Muar, where the Pollution Standard Index (PSI) reached “unhealthy” levels.

In Singapore, the government rushed to put medical subsidies in place, targeting poor by making medical clinics available.

Despite shrugging off blame, Sime Darby has become placed in the crosshairs of the debate.

“Sime Darby owns 93 plantations in Indonesia,” a user by the name @thevikas said.

Some of the hotspots have been connected to land that they own, but the titles and ownership is tricky to pinpoint.

This is just a round-robin blame game, however. The same that has spurred Indonesia to be begin rounding up farmers that have been accused of the fires.

ASEAN members need to identify those owners of the land deeds involved in Riau province and make a concertedly effort next week to build mechanisms to help Indonesia enforcement forestry laws that are clearly being sidelined.

That it took this long only puts further pressure to act now.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
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