Spotlight: The cyber security conundrum – Join the discussion

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edward-snowdenCyber security policies pose a conundrum. In endeavouring to protect citizens against malicious online attacks, how can governments ensure the public they are not abusing their authority?

Former CIA employee Edward Snowden’s exposure of the US’s global surveillance network – which is accused in part of targeting innocent people around the globe — sent a reactive ripple throughout the policy chambers of ASEAN in previous weeks, with the Philippines, Thailand and Malaysia quickly proposing cyber crime amendments and programmes, while Indonesia continued to follow through with its “cyber army.”

Why have ASEAN governments reacted so fast? If there were doubts before, let them be gone: The online space is a porous world with loopholes and blind spots that can be pierced given the intent and tools.

It is apparent that government’s should uphold their mandate to shield the public from such attacks as malicious computer viruses, online scams, phishing, social network hacking, credit card fraud, sexual predation and – the most touchy – terrorist intrigue. But how to draw the line between good intent to weed out criminal activity and invasion of privacy is like entering an ethical minefield.

The Philippine public has demanded that the government curtail some of the authority afforded to itself in the controversial Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. In late May, the Aquino administration followed up with the pleas of journalists and dropped the a clause concerning online libel to now focus more on organised crime – what some would say is a win for the public’s privacy.

Many of the new policies being rushed in directly address cyber crime – but the elephant in the room remains the more clandestine threat of international espionage that has embroiled the US and China. Within ASEAN, Myanmar, Thailand and Indonesia have been under the heaviest observation by the CIA’s crack surveillance programme – PRISM – Snowden’s leaks revealed.

Could US surveillance account for some of the 36 million attacks Indonesia has logged over the past three years?

The question adds an extra layer of complexity to just how vigilant and walled sovereign nations need to be in protecting their government networks and citizens, while all at once tweaking whole populations into consternation over the extent of actual privacy in today’s hyper-connected world.

Want to discuss this hot topic more?

Join Inside Investor’s editorial team for a live chat on twitter by mentioning @insideinvestor and using the hashtag #investvine. The chat will begin on Friday 21 at 3pm Malaysia time (GMT +8)

Topics will include:

  • Are cyber attacks the proxy for actual war?
  • How much will these events compel you to curtail your posting of private information online?
  • How effective are additional security layers and for how long?
  • Do governments have the right to surveillance people suspected of cyber crime without providing evidence to a court?

 

 

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Cyber security policies pose a conundrum. In endeavouring to protect citizens against malicious online attacks, how can governments ensure the public they are not abusing their authority?

Reading Time: 2 minutes

edward-snowdenCyber security policies pose a conundrum. In endeavouring to protect citizens against malicious online attacks, how can governments ensure the public they are not abusing their authority?

Former CIA employee Edward Snowden’s exposure of the US’s global surveillance network – which is accused in part of targeting innocent people around the globe — sent a reactive ripple throughout the policy chambers of ASEAN in previous weeks, with the Philippines, Thailand and Malaysia quickly proposing cyber crime amendments and programmes, while Indonesia continued to follow through with its “cyber army.”

Why have ASEAN governments reacted so fast? If there were doubts before, let them be gone: The online space is a porous world with loopholes and blind spots that can be pierced given the intent and tools.

It is apparent that government’s should uphold their mandate to shield the public from such attacks as malicious computer viruses, online scams, phishing, social network hacking, credit card fraud, sexual predation and – the most touchy – terrorist intrigue. But how to draw the line between good intent to weed out criminal activity and invasion of privacy is like entering an ethical minefield.

The Philippine public has demanded that the government curtail some of the authority afforded to itself in the controversial Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012. In late May, the Aquino administration followed up with the pleas of journalists and dropped the a clause concerning online libel to now focus more on organised crime – what some would say is a win for the public’s privacy.

Many of the new policies being rushed in directly address cyber crime – but the elephant in the room remains the more clandestine threat of international espionage that has embroiled the US and China. Within ASEAN, Myanmar, Thailand and Indonesia have been under the heaviest observation by the CIA’s crack surveillance programme – PRISM – Snowden’s leaks revealed.

Could US surveillance account for some of the 36 million attacks Indonesia has logged over the past three years?

The question adds an extra layer of complexity to just how vigilant and walled sovereign nations need to be in protecting their government networks and citizens, while all at once tweaking whole populations into consternation over the extent of actual privacy in today’s hyper-connected world.

Want to discuss this hot topic more?

Join Inside Investor’s editorial team for a live chat on twitter by mentioning @insideinvestor and using the hashtag #investvine. The chat will begin on Friday 21 at 3pm Malaysia time (GMT +8)

Topics will include:

  • Are cyber attacks the proxy for actual war?
  • How much will these events compel you to curtail your posting of private information online?
  • How effective are additional security layers and for how long?
  • Do governments have the right to surveillance people suspected of cyber crime without providing evidence to a court?

 

 

 

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
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