Sun rises on Japan’s TPP entrance

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The US appears to have galvanised political will in one of the most crucial allies behind the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership, a free trade agreement that incorporates nations in the Far East and Latin America, with the notable exclusion of China.

The government of Japan sent out a briefing to 194 business, agriculture and lobby groups on August 5, notifying them that it is preparing drafts to lower or eliminate tariffs for the Brunei round of the trade pact, the Japan Times reported. The eight-day round of talks in Brunei is set to kick off on August 22.

Japan’s open show to ignore acrimonious opposition against the US-led TPP agreement affords the pact added currency. Japan is a major buyer of raw commodities across the nations of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Rim, lacking the resources itself.

In Malaysia’s state of Sarawak, Japan is the largest buyer of the state’s top export commodities: Liquefied natural gas, crude petroleum, palm oil and timber. The same is true for Brunei’s oil exports, which Japan gobbles up contributing about 94 per cent to the Sultanate’s government revenues.

Moreover, top exports in Vietnam, another negotiating nation (crude oil, agro-commodities, textiles and machinery) are also mainly exported to Japan.

The closer governments of negotiating nations get to the Brunei round, the more protestors and lobby groups detract.

In Tokyo, the Japanese Federation of Fisheries has requested that the government refrain from bringing up fishing subsidies in the TPP talks.

The US, however, has mentioned that the TPP should include a ban of fish subsidies, with other TPP nations discussing the environmental impacts of unsustainable fishing incentives.

Meanwhile, the trade pact has managed to blur the lines of Malaysia’s dependably defined political spectrum. Former Malaysian Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad, known for his anti-Western sentiments, has nonetheless aligned himself with street protestors belonging to the opposition party, who find on this rare occasion an ally in him.

Tokyo made its TPP debut on July 23 toward the end of the 18th round in Malaysia.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Reading Time: 2 minutes

The US appears to have galvanised political will in one of the most crucial allies behind the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership, a free trade agreement that incorporates nations in the Far East and Latin America, with the notable exclusion of China.

The government of Japan sent out a briefing to 194 business, agriculture and lobby groups on August 5, notifying them that it is preparing drafts to lower or eliminate tariffs for the Brunei round of the trade pact, the Japan Times reported. The eight-day round of talks in Brunei is set to kick off on August 22.

Japan’s open show to ignore acrimonious opposition against the US-led TPP agreement affords the pact added currency. Japan is a major buyer of raw commodities across the nations of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Rim, lacking the resources itself.

In Malaysia’s state of Sarawak, Japan is the largest buyer of the state’s top export commodities: Liquefied natural gas, crude petroleum, palm oil and timber. The same is true for Brunei’s oil exports, which Japan gobbles up contributing about 94 per cent to the Sultanate’s government revenues.

Moreover, top exports in Vietnam, another negotiating nation (crude oil, agro-commodities, textiles and machinery) are also mainly exported to Japan.

The closer governments of negotiating nations get to the Brunei round, the more protestors and lobby groups detract.

In Tokyo, the Japanese Federation of Fisheries has requested that the government refrain from bringing up fishing subsidies in the TPP talks.

The US, however, has mentioned that the TPP should include a ban of fish subsidies, with other TPP nations discussing the environmental impacts of unsustainable fishing incentives.

Meanwhile, the trade pact has managed to blur the lines of Malaysia’s dependably defined political spectrum. Former Malaysian Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad, known for his anti-Western sentiments, has nonetheless aligned himself with street protestors belonging to the opposition party, who find on this rare occasion an ally in him.

Tokyo made its TPP debut on July 23 toward the end of the 18th round in Malaysia.

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