SwitzGo, Shootsta: No shortage in innovative startups in Southeast Asia despite virus crisis


Despite a disruption of the disruptive innovation industry by the coronavirus pandemic , new business ideas and startups are still prevalent and very active in Southeast Asia, Investvine can share based on two illustrative examples.

A new food and grocery delivery services with a novelty touch has been launched in Malaysia: SwitzGo. The company, an offspring of catering service firm Alfameli Sdn Bhd, aims to fulfill the demands in food delivery service by introducing a much safer and cleaner delivery option in times of a virus-hit environment.

According to Amir Latiff, chief marketing officer of SwitzGo, the service is using delivery bags equipped with self-cleaning surfaces by putting NanoSeptic stickers in them. NanoSeptic is a technology developed by US startup Nanotouch Materials that utilises mineral nano-crystals which create a powerful oxidation reaction to disinfect surfaces of all kind.

NanoSeptic stickers have been used worldwide in various industries such as healthcare, hospitality, travel, education and commercial businesses to ensure common touch points such as door handles, elevators, common areas and bathrooms remain visibly clean and free from bacteria and viruses.

“SwitzGo is now the first delivery company in Malaysia to introduce this technology here,” Latiff said.

Currently, SwitzGo offers food delivery within Bangsar and Petaling Jaya areas. Working with more than 100 restaurants so far, vendors and hawkers around the area, SwitzGo aims to penetrate other areas in the Klang Valley and other state capitals within the next three months by getting at least ten new restaurants and eateries onboard every week.

“Disrupting the video production industry”

Another startup seeking to expand across Southeast Asia from its headquarters in Singapore is Shootsta, a company focusing on digital communication.

The business model is to produce low-cost company and brand videos on demand in a subscription model from a client’s own video shooting.

According to Mike Pritchett, Founder and CEO of Shootsta, a company can upload a video using a “Shootsta Kit” and then have it produced and professionally edited by the Shootsta team in not more than 24 hours.

Shootsta would provide help in pre-production planning corporate videos, do the brainstorming for content ideas and also train how to shoot useable footage. When the raw video is done, the Shootsta team would create what it calls a motion graphic suite, for example by adding animated intros and outros to give the videos a clear, consistent “look and feel” across content, Pritchett noted.

This would not only appeal to new and innovative brands, but would also turn traditional legacy companies into something more suitable for the modern age with younger target consumers. The method has also proved popular during the Covid-19 pandemic when digital channels became more important.

Shootsta, which aims at nothing less than “disrupting the video production industry,” has already branch offices in Hong Kong, Sydney, California and London and works with some blue-chip brands such as Cathay Pacific, Qantas, Grab, BHP Billiton, HSBC and LinkedIn, among others.

Despite a disruption of the disruptive innovation industry by the coronavirus pandemic , new business ideas and startups are still prevalent and very active in Southeast Asia, Investvine can share based on two illustrative examples. A new food and grocery delivery services with a novelty touch has been launched in Malaysia: SwitzGo. The company, an offspring of catering service firm Alfameli Sdn Bhd, aims to fulfill the demands in food delivery service by introducing a much safer and cleaner delivery option in times of a virus-hit environment. According to Amir Latiff, chief marketing officer of SwitzGo, the service is using...


Despite a disruption of the disruptive innovation industry by the coronavirus pandemic , new business ideas and startups are still prevalent and very active in Southeast Asia, Investvine can share based on two illustrative examples.

A new food and grocery delivery services with a novelty touch has been launched in Malaysia: SwitzGo. The company, an offspring of catering service firm Alfameli Sdn Bhd, aims to fulfill the demands in food delivery service by introducing a much safer and cleaner delivery option in times of a virus-hit environment.

According to Amir Latiff, chief marketing officer of SwitzGo, the service is using delivery bags equipped with self-cleaning surfaces by putting NanoSeptic stickers in them. NanoSeptic is a technology developed by US startup Nanotouch Materials that utilises mineral nano-crystals which create a powerful oxidation reaction to disinfect surfaces of all kind.

NanoSeptic stickers have been used worldwide in various industries such as healthcare, hospitality, travel, education and commercial businesses to ensure common touch points such as door handles, elevators, common areas and bathrooms remain visibly clean and free from bacteria and viruses.

“SwitzGo is now the first delivery company in Malaysia to introduce this technology here,” Latiff said.

Currently, SwitzGo offers food delivery within Bangsar and Petaling Jaya areas. Working with more than 100 restaurants so far, vendors and hawkers around the area, SwitzGo aims to penetrate other areas in the Klang Valley and other state capitals within the next three months by getting at least ten new restaurants and eateries onboard every week.

“Disrupting the video production industry”

Another startup seeking to expand across Southeast Asia from its headquarters in Singapore is Shootsta, a company focusing on digital communication.

The business model is to produce low-cost company and brand videos on demand in a subscription model from a client’s own video shooting.

According to Mike Pritchett, Founder and CEO of Shootsta, a company can upload a video using a “Shootsta Kit” and then have it produced and professionally edited by the Shootsta team in not more than 24 hours.

Shootsta would provide help in pre-production planning corporate videos, do the brainstorming for content ideas and also train how to shoot useable footage. When the raw video is done, the Shootsta team would create what it calls a motion graphic suite, for example by adding animated intros and outros to give the videos a clear, consistent “look and feel” across content, Pritchett noted.

This would not only appeal to new and innovative brands, but would also turn traditional legacy companies into something more suitable for the modern age with younger target consumers. The method has also proved popular during the Covid-19 pandemic when digital channels became more important.

Shootsta, which aims at nothing less than “disrupting the video production industry,” has already branch offices in Hong Kong, Sydney, California and London and works with some blue-chip brands such as Cathay Pacific, Qantas, Grab, BHP Billiton, HSBC and LinkedIn, among others.

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