Tall order for Myanmar infrastructure

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Myanmar-road1Over the next 20 years, Myanmar’s infrastructure needs add up to between $100 billion and $150 billion, with another $40 billion to $60 billion estimated for property investment in Yangon, Kenneth Stevens, managing partner of Leopard Capital, an Asian firm that invests in emerging markets, said at a recent conference in Yangon.

“For the next 20 years or so, I expect Myanmar will spend 10 per cent of its GDP or $5 billion every year on infrastructure such as power, ports, oil refineries and highways,” Stevens predicted.

In a move to further its influence as a top player in the Myanmar investment rush, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has scheduled a visit to Myanmar for Friday, May 24, according to Japanese business executives.

During a planned meeting with Myanmar President Thein Sein, the two leaders will reportedly sign an Official Development Assistance deal, solidifying Japan’s support for infrastructure construction projects in Myanmar’s special economic zones.

Under the agreement Japanese aid would be used to build infrastructure in the Thilawa special economic zone, now considered the darling-of-preference over the stalled Dawei complex.

According to the Myanma Port Authority (MPA), a $205 million low-interest, long-term loan from the deal will be extended to Myanmar.

The first construction phase of the project will begin in May 2014.

 

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Over the next 20 years, Myanmar’s infrastructure needs add up to between $100 billion and $150 billion, with another $40 billion to $60 billion estimated for property investment in Yangon, Kenneth Stevens, managing partner of Leopard Capital, an Asian firm that invests in emerging markets, said at a recent conference in Yangon.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Myanmar-road1Over the next 20 years, Myanmar’s infrastructure needs add up to between $100 billion and $150 billion, with another $40 billion to $60 billion estimated for property investment in Yangon, Kenneth Stevens, managing partner of Leopard Capital, an Asian firm that invests in emerging markets, said at a recent conference in Yangon.

“For the next 20 years or so, I expect Myanmar will spend 10 per cent of its GDP or $5 billion every year on infrastructure such as power, ports, oil refineries and highways,” Stevens predicted.

In a move to further its influence as a top player in the Myanmar investment rush, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has scheduled a visit to Myanmar for Friday, May 24, according to Japanese business executives.

During a planned meeting with Myanmar President Thein Sein, the two leaders will reportedly sign an Official Development Assistance deal, solidifying Japan’s support for infrastructure construction projects in Myanmar’s special economic zones.

Under the agreement Japanese aid would be used to build infrastructure in the Thilawa special economic zone, now considered the darling-of-preference over the stalled Dawei complex.

According to the Myanma Port Authority (MPA), a $205 million low-interest, long-term loan from the deal will be extended to Myanmar.

The first construction phase of the project will begin in May 2014.

 

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