Thai gov’t to deploy 200,000 police on election day

Reading Time: 1 minute

Thai voteThailand’s government will deploy 200,000 police nationwide and 10,000 in the capital Bangkok for the February 2 elections, which protesters have promised to disrupt as part of their drawn-out attempt to topple the government and Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

The government decided to go ahead with the polls despite warnings that it could lead to more violence without resolving the country’s increasingly bitter political divide.

The 200,000 will comprise members of 1,450 rapid deployment units from local police stations. They will provide security at 93,535 polling units in 375 constituencies across 77 provinces.

“I ask Bangkok residents to come out and vote,” Labour Minister Chalerm Yoobamrung told reporters on January 29. “The police will take care of security … Those who are thinking of going and shutting polling stations in the morning should think twice because the police will not allow them to.”

The latest round of violence erupted on January 26 as demonstrators surrounded polling stations in Bangkok and towns located in opposition enclaves in the country’s south, preventing hundreds of thousands of voters from casting early ballots. Pictures of would-be voters being verbally abused, and in one case strangled, by protesters went viral on social networking sites.

Analysts warn that unless serious talks commence between Thailand’s warring parties, large-scale violence could erupt as Thais head to the polls for elections on February 2. However, despite the imposition of the emergency rule, police appeared hesitant to restrain the rowdy demonstrators who took to the capital’s streets to intimidate potential voters from casting their ballots. Law enforcement officials, who are largely believed to support Yingluck, continue to grapple with their tenuous relations with the military, who are regarded as hardline royalists and furtive backers of the anti-government protests.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 1 minute

Thailand’s government will deploy 200,000 police nationwide and 10,000 in the capital Bangkok for the February 2 elections, which protesters have promised to disrupt as part of their drawn-out attempt to topple the government and Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Thai voteThailand’s government will deploy 200,000 police nationwide and 10,000 in the capital Bangkok for the February 2 elections, which protesters have promised to disrupt as part of their drawn-out attempt to topple the government and Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

The government decided to go ahead with the polls despite warnings that it could lead to more violence without resolving the country’s increasingly bitter political divide.

The 200,000 will comprise members of 1,450 rapid deployment units from local police stations. They will provide security at 93,535 polling units in 375 constituencies across 77 provinces.

“I ask Bangkok residents to come out and vote,” Labour Minister Chalerm Yoobamrung told reporters on January 29. “The police will take care of security … Those who are thinking of going and shutting polling stations in the morning should think twice because the police will not allow them to.”

The latest round of violence erupted on January 26 as demonstrators surrounded polling stations in Bangkok and towns located in opposition enclaves in the country’s south, preventing hundreds of thousands of voters from casting early ballots. Pictures of would-be voters being verbally abused, and in one case strangled, by protesters went viral on social networking sites.

Analysts warn that unless serious talks commence between Thailand’s warring parties, large-scale violence could erupt as Thais head to the polls for elections on February 2. However, despite the imposition of the emergency rule, police appeared hesitant to restrain the rowdy demonstrators who took to the capital’s streets to intimidate potential voters from casting their ballots. Law enforcement officials, who are largely believed to support Yingluck, continue to grapple with their tenuous relations with the military, who are regarded as hardline royalists and furtive backers of the anti-government protests.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid