Thailand expats warned to avoid riots

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bangkok_protestsWith around 80,000 people forming in Bangkok for the largest street rally since the violent crackdown in 2010 and busloads of more on August 4 heading to the Thai capital, expats and tourists have been warned to stay clear of the protests.

The Canadian embassy was the first to release a statement, saying that ”Canadians should remain vigilant at all times, avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.”

Anti-Thaksin demonstrations will be held at Lumpini Park. Organisers this time expect protesters to be more resilient and anticipate there will be resistence if police try to dictate what the protesters can or cannot do.

An emergency law has already been passed allowing for tough action if required. The white mask group is among organisations expected to join the protest.

Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra conceded that violence could erupt during the protest. She called for talks to diffuse political tensions.

”Although there is only a one percent chance of success, I want the conflict to end in this generation,” she said.

Police have said they are authorised to use water cannon, tear gas and rubber bullets if violence erupts.

In 2010, with a Democrat Government in power, protests by Thaksin’s Red Shirt supporters led to a military crackdown and shooting in the streets with 90 killed and 1,900 wounded in central Bangkok.

The country has been riven by political tensions since the overthrow of Thaksin, a deeply divisive figure who lives abroad but still draws loyalty among the kingdom’s poor, rural working class.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

With around 80,000 people forming in Bangkok for the largest street rally since the violent crackdown in 2010 and busloads of more on August 4 heading to the Thai capital, expats and tourists have been warned to stay clear of the protests.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

bangkok_protestsWith around 80,000 people forming in Bangkok for the largest street rally since the violent crackdown in 2010 and busloads of more on August 4 heading to the Thai capital, expats and tourists have been warned to stay clear of the protests.

The Canadian embassy was the first to release a statement, saying that ”Canadians should remain vigilant at all times, avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.”

Anti-Thaksin demonstrations will be held at Lumpini Park. Organisers this time expect protesters to be more resilient and anticipate there will be resistence if police try to dictate what the protesters can or cannot do.

An emergency law has already been passed allowing for tough action if required. The white mask group is among organisations expected to join the protest.

Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra conceded that violence could erupt during the protest. She called for talks to diffuse political tensions.

”Although there is only a one percent chance of success, I want the conflict to end in this generation,” she said.

Police have said they are authorised to use water cannon, tear gas and rubber bullets if violence erupts.

In 2010, with a Democrat Government in power, protests by Thaksin’s Red Shirt supporters led to a military crackdown and shooting in the streets with 90 killed and 1,900 wounded in central Bangkok.

The country has been riven by political tensions since the overthrow of Thaksin, a deeply divisive figure who lives abroad but still draws loyalty among the kingdom’s poor, rural working class.

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