Thailand follows Brazil in child labour policy

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BurmeseFishingImmigrants
Thailand wants to tackle child labour issues that mainly occurs in the fishery industry and involves illegal migrants

Brazil and Thailand are two countries that were struggling with cracking down on child labour; however, Brazil was recently acknowledged by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) for being able to diminish child labour as well as for being a role model for other countries.

By Mariana Angela Garcia

Thailand has shown interest in Brazil’s practices to reduce child labour specifically in the fishing industry. In February 2013, the ILO Thailand, Ministry of Labour of Thailand and the Ministry of Labour and Employment of Brazil had a series of meetings in Bangkok in order to share experiences and innovation between the two countries to reduce child labour.

The Bangkok Post quoted Maruizio Bussi, ILO’s director for Thailand, Cambodia and Laos, complementing Brazil on its achievements throughout the series of meetings.

“The key factors that helped Brazil thwart child labour were the determination of the government and politicians to abide by labour standards set by the ILO. The government allocated a substantial budget to solve the problem and all parties are helping eradicate it, ” he said.

The meetings were directly targeted to get an insight on Brazil’s approach on child labour the help Thai inspectors and representatives of the Fishery Association of Thailand, which mostly struggles with child labour, to create an action plan.

Luiz Henrique Ramos Lopes, deputy director-general of Brazil’s Labor Inspection Department, said that Brazil has been successful with its inspection system. In their inspection last year 67 per cent of more than 250,000 businesses committed breaches. However, through its authorisation to visit operators without notification, Brazil’s inspection system has been able to reach child labour victims quickly. The result was that Brazil has been removed from the human-trafficking watch list.

Pakorn Amornchqin, director-general of Thailand’s Department of Welfare and Labour Protection, said that Thailand would adopt Brazil’s inspection system in order to be removed from the human-trafficking watch list as well.

 

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Thailand wants to tackle child labour issues that mainly occurs in the fishery industry and involves illegal migrants

Brazil and Thailand are two countries that were struggling with cracking down on child labour; however, Brazil was recently acknowledged by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) for being able to diminish child labour as well as for being a role model for other countries.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

BurmeseFishingImmigrants
Thailand wants to tackle child labour issues that mainly occurs in the fishery industry and involves illegal migrants

Brazil and Thailand are two countries that were struggling with cracking down on child labour; however, Brazil was recently acknowledged by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) for being able to diminish child labour as well as for being a role model for other countries.

By Mariana Angela Garcia

Thailand has shown interest in Brazil’s practices to reduce child labour specifically in the fishing industry. In February 2013, the ILO Thailand, Ministry of Labour of Thailand and the Ministry of Labour and Employment of Brazil had a series of meetings in Bangkok in order to share experiences and innovation between the two countries to reduce child labour.

The Bangkok Post quoted Maruizio Bussi, ILO’s director for Thailand, Cambodia and Laos, complementing Brazil on its achievements throughout the series of meetings.

“The key factors that helped Brazil thwart child labour were the determination of the government and politicians to abide by labour standards set by the ILO. The government allocated a substantial budget to solve the problem and all parties are helping eradicate it, ” he said.

The meetings were directly targeted to get an insight on Brazil’s approach on child labour the help Thai inspectors and representatives of the Fishery Association of Thailand, which mostly struggles with child labour, to create an action plan.

Luiz Henrique Ramos Lopes, deputy director-general of Brazil’s Labor Inspection Department, said that Brazil has been successful with its inspection system. In their inspection last year 67 per cent of more than 250,000 businesses committed breaches. However, through its authorisation to visit operators without notification, Brazil’s inspection system has been able to reach child labour victims quickly. The result was that Brazil has been removed from the human-trafficking watch list.

Pakorn Amornchqin, director-general of Thailand’s Department of Welfare and Labour Protection, said that Thailand would adopt Brazil’s inspection system in order to be removed from the human-trafficking watch list as well.

 

 

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