Thailand on ambitious solar power push

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solar power monks_1With an official government development plan due in June 2013, Thailand is set to retain its reputation as ASEAN’s most aggressive developer of solar power amid increased foreign investment in the renewable energy.

According to government sources, Thailand is planning to support 100,000 domestic rooftop solar systems and 1,000 commercial systems through a financial framework that would cover feed-in premiums to attract foreign investors, the Bangkok Post reported. Similar schemes have been proposed to boost solar power production in the Philippines and Indonesia.

Since 2008, Thailand has implemented an alternative energy strategy, including large-scale solar projects, but rooftop solar was visibly omitted until now.

Thailand has 211.85 megawatts of solar power capacity with 60 megamatts connected to the national grid, according to 2012 data published by the Energy Policy and Planning Office of the Ministry of Energy.

The new rooftop systems would at a total projected 800 megawatts of capacity, making Thailand by far the largest producer of solar energy in ASEAN. In comparison, Indonesia had 20 megawatts of solar energy installed in 2012.

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Along with the new drive, Thailand is in the process of revising its renewable energy development plan for 2022, lifting its target for solar power from 500 mega watts to 1,000.

The written-in premium offered for developers of large-scale solar power projects in Thailand is 6.5 to 8 baht per kWh, a rate that could be extended to rooftop systems in the anticipated governmental plan.

Thailand’s history with renewable energy has made the market welcoming.

“We are convinced that a lot of home owners would like to participate in the solar energy sector,” Dusit Kruangam, the chairman of the Thai Photovoltaic Industries Association, told PV-Tech, an industry-specific online news portal.

According to the Ministry of Energy, the highest levels of solar radiation in Thailand are in the country’s central region between Bangkok and Chiang Mai, as well as large swathes of Isaan in the northwest. (see map).

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

With an official government development plan due in June 2013, Thailand is set to retain its reputation as ASEAN’s most aggressive developer of solar power amid increased foreign investment in the renewable energy.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

solar power monks_1With an official government development plan due in June 2013, Thailand is set to retain its reputation as ASEAN’s most aggressive developer of solar power amid increased foreign investment in the renewable energy.

According to government sources, Thailand is planning to support 100,000 domestic rooftop solar systems and 1,000 commercial systems through a financial framework that would cover feed-in premiums to attract foreign investors, the Bangkok Post reported. Similar schemes have been proposed to boost solar power production in the Philippines and Indonesia.

Since 2008, Thailand has implemented an alternative energy strategy, including large-scale solar projects, but rooftop solar was visibly omitted until now.

Thailand has 211.85 megawatts of solar power capacity with 60 megamatts connected to the national grid, according to 2012 data published by the Energy Policy and Planning Office of the Ministry of Energy.

The new rooftop systems would at a total projected 800 megawatts of capacity, making Thailand by far the largest producer of solar energy in ASEAN. In comparison, Indonesia had 20 megawatts of solar energy installed in 2012.

Slide 1
Click to enlarge

Along with the new drive, Thailand is in the process of revising its renewable energy development plan for 2022, lifting its target for solar power from 500 mega watts to 1,000.

The written-in premium offered for developers of large-scale solar power projects in Thailand is 6.5 to 8 baht per kWh, a rate that could be extended to rooftop systems in the anticipated governmental plan.

Thailand’s history with renewable energy has made the market welcoming.

“We are convinced that a lot of home owners would like to participate in the solar energy sector,” Dusit Kruangam, the chairman of the Thai Photovoltaic Industries Association, told PV-Tech, an industry-specific online news portal.

According to the Ministry of Energy, the highest levels of solar radiation in Thailand are in the country’s central region between Bangkok and Chiang Mai, as well as large swathes of Isaan in the northwest. (see map).

 

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