Thailand returns to normal after bomb spree

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Thailand bombsThai police said that conditions have “returned to normal” following a series of deadly bomb blasts over the past days, with a political activist the first person confirmed to be detained.

It has been officially ruled out that the attacks had any links to international terrorism or Islamist extremists. Remarkably, police also dismissed the likelihood that they had something to do with separatist insurgent groups which have been fighting the Thai armed forces in the three Malay-Muslim provinces on the Thai-Malaysian border for the past 12 years.

The government instead described the attacks as “domestic sabotage”, hinting that the most likely perpetrators were members of the political opposition in the country, namely those who lost out in the constitution referendum on August 7.

The person apprehendedĀ  is a 67-year-old political activist and former constitution writer in the southern province of Trang. He denied any involvement in the coordinated attacks. Nobody has claimed responsibility as of yet.

It is believed that the military will direct their investigation towards the so-called red shirt movement, a political group opposing the 2014 coup that ousted prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

Meanwhile, Thai official said that the bomb attacks would only have a short-time deterring effect on tourism. While there have been cancellations of planned vacation trips to Thailand, visitors interview by local media more or less took a grim sense of resigning to the fate that terrorism has become as a new life situation all over the world.

A French tourist in Hua Hin, asked about her feelings of security after the blasts in the resort town, cynically said “I have seen worse,” referring to the July attack carried out by a Tunisian-born man who rammed a truck into a holiday crowd in Nice and a mass hostage taking at a Paris concert hall in November last year in which more than 100 people were killed.

On-site visits by Investvine at various tourist spots in Bangkok showed that they were bustling with visitors as always, although security has clearly been tightened, with police coming up with sniffer dogs at Khao San Road and conducting bag searches at nightlife centers around Sukhumvit.

“We have not yet seen any kind of impact but even if there is any, there is most likely to be a recovery as in the past,” Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul, Minister of Tourism and Sports, said. She added that her ministry was maintaining its target of around $66 billion in revenue from tourism this year and projected record visitor numbers of 32 million.

 

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Thai police said that conditions have “returned to normal” following a series of deadly bomb blasts over the past days, with a political activist the first person confirmed to be detained.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Thailand bombsThai police said that conditions have “returned to normal” following a series of deadly bomb blasts over the past days, with a political activist the first person confirmed to be detained.

It has been officially ruled out that the attacks had any links to international terrorism or Islamist extremists. Remarkably, police also dismissed the likelihood that they had something to do with separatist insurgent groups which have been fighting the Thai armed forces in the three Malay-Muslim provinces on the Thai-Malaysian border for the past 12 years.

The government instead described the attacks as “domestic sabotage”, hinting that the most likely perpetrators were members of the political opposition in the country, namely those who lost out in the constitution referendum on August 7.

The person apprehendedĀ  is a 67-year-old political activist and former constitution writer in the southern province of Trang. He denied any involvement in the coordinated attacks. Nobody has claimed responsibility as of yet.

It is believed that the military will direct their investigation towards the so-called red shirt movement, a political group opposing the 2014 coup that ousted prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

Meanwhile, Thai official said that the bomb attacks would only have a short-time deterring effect on tourism. While there have been cancellations of planned vacation trips to Thailand, visitors interview by local media more or less took a grim sense of resigning to the fate that terrorism has become as a new life situation all over the world.

A French tourist in Hua Hin, asked about her feelings of security after the blasts in the resort town, cynically said “I have seen worse,” referring to the July attack carried out by a Tunisian-born man who rammed a truck into a holiday crowd in Nice and a mass hostage taking at a Paris concert hall in November last year in which more than 100 people were killed.

On-site visits by Investvine at various tourist spots in Bangkok showed that they were bustling with visitors as always, although security has clearly been tightened, with police coming up with sniffer dogs at Khao San Road and conducting bag searches at nightlife centers around Sukhumvit.

“We have not yet seen any kind of impact but even if there is any, there is most likely to be a recovery as in the past,” Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul, Minister of Tourism and Sports, said. She added that her ministry was maintaining its target of around $66 billion in revenue from tourism this year and projected record visitor numbers of 32 million.

 

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