Thailand serves Myanmar solar

Thailand serves Myanmar solar
Most of Myanmar people depend on diesel oil generators for power

Thailand-based solar farm developer SPCG is planning to operate two small solar farms in Myanmar to help meet unmet demand for energy in communities outside of Yangon and Mandalay, the country’s two biggest cities.

The initial investment will require $2.2 million and will be developed on a plot of 4.8 acres of land, producing just under 2MW outside of each city center.

Demand for energy in Myanmar is growing rapidly, yet the country relies on the majority of its power needs from hydropower, which is captured from the country’s large network of inland waterways.

It is estimated that Myanmar’s energy capacity is just 2,500MW, a figure that falls dramatically short for its population of nearly 60 million people when compared to Thailand’s output of 32,000MW.

Besides Thailand, investors in China, India and Japan have also signaled interest in setting up solar energy farms in Myanmar.

At the moment, the majority of people in Myanmar depend on costly diesel oil generators to power their homes, a source which is twice the price of an average solar farm.

SPCG is also eyeing other renewable projects in largely undeveloped economy, including mini-hydropower plants and wind farms.

Myanmar produces 70 per cent of its electricity through hydropower and the remaining through gas (22 per cent) and coal (8 per cent).



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

[caption id="attachment_6308" align="alignleft" width="300"] Most of Myanmar people depend on diesel oil generators for power[/caption] Thailand-based solar farm developer SPCG is planning to operate two small solar farms in Myanmar to help meet unmet demand for energy in communities outside of Yangon and Mandalay, the country’s two biggest cities. The initial investment will require $2.2 million and will be developed on a plot of 4.8 acres of land, producing just under 2MW outside of each city center. Demand for energy in Myanmar is growing rapidly, yet the country relies on the majority of its power needs from hydropower, which is...

Thailand serves Myanmar solar
Most of Myanmar people depend on diesel oil generators for power

Thailand-based solar farm developer SPCG is planning to operate two small solar farms in Myanmar to help meet unmet demand for energy in communities outside of Yangon and Mandalay, the country’s two biggest cities.

The initial investment will require $2.2 million and will be developed on a plot of 4.8 acres of land, producing just under 2MW outside of each city center.

Demand for energy in Myanmar is growing rapidly, yet the country relies on the majority of its power needs from hydropower, which is captured from the country’s large network of inland waterways.

It is estimated that Myanmar’s energy capacity is just 2,500MW, a figure that falls dramatically short for its population of nearly 60 million people when compared to Thailand’s output of 32,000MW.

Besides Thailand, investors in China, India and Japan have also signaled interest in setting up solar energy farms in Myanmar.

At the moment, the majority of people in Myanmar depend on costly diesel oil generators to power their homes, a source which is twice the price of an average solar farm.

SPCG is also eyeing other renewable projects in largely undeveloped economy, including mini-hydropower plants and wind farms.

Myanmar produces 70 per cent of its electricity through hydropower and the remaining through gas (22 per cent) and coal (8 per cent).



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

NO COMMENTS

Leave a Reply