Thailand sets radical targets for solar energy

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solar powered tuk tuk
Solar powered tuk tuk in Thailand

The Thai government has said that it aims to build 3,000 megawatts of solar power capacity by 2021, 50 per cent more than previously planned. The announcement came together with the approval of new subsidies for rooftop and village-based solar power projects.

The government will work with the Village Fund, a state-run microcredit provider, to develop 800 megawatts of community-owned photovoltaic plants by the end of 2014, the Ministry of Energy said in a statement.

In addition, 200 megawatts of rooftop installations built by the end of the year will be eligible for the special rates, it said. Half must be built on residential homes.

Thailand, which currently relies on fossil fuels for 80 per cent of its energy consumption, seeks to build 13,927 megawatts of clean-energy capacity by 2021, an increase from previous plans of approximately 9,200 megawatts.

Overall, output from biomass will be 4,800 megawatts, from biogas 3,600 megawatts, from solar 3,000 megawatts, from wind 1,800 megawatts and the balance will come from hydropower and waste.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Solar powered tuk tuk in Thailand

The Thai government has said that it aims to build 3,000 megawatts of solar power capacity by 2021, 50 per cent more than previously planned. The announcement came together with the approval of new subsidies for rooftop and village-based solar power projects.

Reading Time: 1 minute

solar powered tuk tuk
Solar powered tuk tuk in Thailand

The Thai government has said that it aims to build 3,000 megawatts of solar power capacity by 2021, 50 per cent more than previously planned. The announcement came together with the approval of new subsidies for rooftop and village-based solar power projects.

The government will work with the Village Fund, a state-run microcredit provider, to develop 800 megawatts of community-owned photovoltaic plants by the end of 2014, the Ministry of Energy said in a statement.

In addition, 200 megawatts of rooftop installations built by the end of the year will be eligible for the special rates, it said. Half must be built on residential homes.

Thailand, which currently relies on fossil fuels for 80 per cent of its energy consumption, seeks to build 13,927 megawatts of clean-energy capacity by 2021, an increase from previous plans of approximately 9,200 megawatts.

Overall, output from biomass will be 4,800 megawatts, from biogas 3,600 megawatts, from solar 3,000 megawatts, from wind 1,800 megawatts and the balance will come from hydropower and waste.

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