That’s how flight MH17 came down (video)

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MH17 and BukInvestigators probing the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 concluded that a Russia-made antiaircraft missile, Buk, struck the Boeing 777 jetliner, causing it to break apart in midair before the wreckage plummeted for up to a minute and a half to the ground.

According to Tjibbe Joustra, chairman of the Dutch Safety Board, which on October 13 published its final report into the 2014 disaster that killed all 298 people on board, the crash was caused by “the detonation of a warhead” to the left of the cockpit.

Giving what was the most detailed description of the jet’s final moments to date, Joustra said the explosion killed the plane’s three crew members in the cockpit instantly and that investigators had found “high energy fragments” in their bodies.

The blast — less than one meter from the plane’s fuselage — also caused “structural damage,” which resulted in the jet’s “forward part” tearing off. The plane broke up in midair and scattered over a 52-square-kilometer area, he said. Why some passengers might have been conscious up to one and a half minute after the crash during the fast descent of the plane, the impact on the ground was “unsurvivable,” the report concluded.

The board, however, did not assign blame for the deadly crash.

But it critisied air traffic authorities for not recognising the risks in flying over the conflict zone in the east of Ukraine. Two military aircraft were shot down in the three days before MH17’s crash, the report said, adding that this should have “provided sufficient reason for closing the airspace above the eastern part of Ukraine as a precaution.”

“The aviation parties involved did not adequately recognise the risks of the armed conflict,” the report said.

(Short version of the report here. Long version here.)

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Investigators probing the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 concluded that a Russia-made antiaircraft missile, Buk, struck the Boeing 777 jetliner, causing it to break apart in midair before the wreckage plummeted for up to a minute and a half to the ground.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

MH17 and BukInvestigators probing the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 concluded that a Russia-made antiaircraft missile, Buk, struck the Boeing 777 jetliner, causing it to break apart in midair before the wreckage plummeted for up to a minute and a half to the ground.

According to Tjibbe Joustra, chairman of the Dutch Safety Board, which on October 13 published its final report into the 2014 disaster that killed all 298 people on board, the crash was caused by “the detonation of a warhead” to the left of the cockpit.

Giving what was the most detailed description of the jet’s final moments to date, Joustra said the explosion killed the plane’s three crew members in the cockpit instantly and that investigators had found “high energy fragments” in their bodies.

The blast — less than one meter from the plane’s fuselage — also caused “structural damage,” which resulted in the jet’s “forward part” tearing off. The plane broke up in midair and scattered over a 52-square-kilometer area, he said. Why some passengers might have been conscious up to one and a half minute after the crash during the fast descent of the plane, the impact on the ground was “unsurvivable,” the report concluded.

The board, however, did not assign blame for the deadly crash.

But it critisied air traffic authorities for not recognising the risks in flying over the conflict zone in the east of Ukraine. Two military aircraft were shot down in the three days before MH17’s crash, the report said, adding that this should have “provided sufficient reason for closing the airspace above the eastern part of Ukraine as a precaution.”

“The aviation parties involved did not adequately recognise the risks of the armed conflict,” the report said.

(Short version of the report here. Long version here.)

Do you like this post?
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